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"An impeachable offense is whatever a majority of the House of Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history; conviction results from whatever offense or offenses two-thirds of the other body considers to be sufficiently serious to require removal of the accused from office."

 

(Gerald Ford's prescient remarks in the U.S. House of Representatives in an effort to impeach Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (15 April 1970); recorded in the Congressional Record, vol. 116, p. 11913.)

Basically, the answer is "no difference". They are both the same consequences. If Trump is politically toxic enough for GOP congress to throw under the bus - OR to lose the House/Senate majority in midterm elections in 2018 - he will just as likely to be impeached for sneezing out of order as for perjury as for obstruction of justice. As Joseph Stalin Stalin's Chief Prosecutor Vyshinsky stated: "Был бы человек, а статья найдется" ("Give me a man, and I'll find a law to convict him under"). Or, quoting idiomatically, from Wolfe's ""Bonfire of the Vanities": "a grand jury would 'indict a ham sandwich,' if that's what you wanted."

Having said that, purely theoretically, Senate refused to convict William Jefferson Clinton for perjury, so you can make a logical case that perjury consequences can't be any worse than obstruction of justice, since the former can get you off scott free and the latter isn't known (as nobody was ever tried by the Senate on that charge).

"An impeachable offense is whatever a majority of the House of Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history; conviction results from whatever offense or offenses two-thirds of the other body considers to be sufficiently serious to require removal of the accused from office."

 

(Gerald Ford's prescient remarks in the U.S. House of Representatives in an effort to impeach Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (15 April 1970); recorded in the Congressional Record, vol. 116, p. 11913.)

Basically, the answer is "no difference". They are both the same consequences. If Trump is politically toxic enough for GOP congress to throw under the bus - OR to lose the House/Senate majority in midterm elections in 2018 - he will just as likely to be impeached for sneezing out of order as for perjury as for obstruction of justice. As Joseph Stalin Stalin's Chief Prosecutor Vyshinsky stated: "Был бы человек, а статья найдется" ("Give me a man, and I'll find a law to convict him under"). Or, quoting idiomatically, from Wolfe's ""Bonfire of the Vanities": "a grand jury would 'indict a ham sandwich,' if that's what you wanted."

Having said that, purely theoretically, Senate refused to convict William Jefferson Clinton for perjury, so you can make a logical case that perjury consequences can't be any worse than obstruction of justice, since the former can get you off scott free and the latter isn't known (as nobody was ever tried by the Senate on that charge).

"An impeachable offense is whatever a majority of the House of Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history; conviction results from whatever offense or offenses two-thirds of the other body considers to be sufficiently serious to require removal of the accused from office."

(Gerald Ford's prescient remarks in the U.S. House of Representatives in an effort to impeach Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (15 April 1970); recorded in the Congressional Record, vol. 116, p. 11913.)

Basically, the answer is "no difference". They are both the same consequences. If Trump is politically toxic enough for GOP congress to throw under the bus - OR to lose the House/Senate majority in midterm elections in 2018 - he will just as likely to be impeached for sneezing out of order as for perjury as for obstruction of justice. As Joseph Stalin Stalin's Chief Prosecutor Vyshinsky stated: "Был бы человек, а статья найдется" ("Give me a man, and I'll find a law to convict him under"). Or, quoting idiomatically, from Wolfe's ""Bonfire of the Vanities": "a grand jury would 'indict a ham sandwich,' if that's what you wanted."

Having said that, purely theoretically, Senate refused to convict William Jefferson Clinton for perjury, so you can make a logical case that perjury consequences can't be any worse than obstruction of justice, since the former can get you off scott free and the latter isn't known (as nobody was ever tried by the Senate on that charge).

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"An impeachable offense is whatever a majority of the House of Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history; conviction results from whatever offense or offenses two-thirds of the other body considers to be sufficiently serious to require removal of the accused from office."

(Gerald Ford's prescient remarks in the U.S. House of Representatives in an effort to impeach Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (15 April 1970); recorded in the Congressional Record, vol. 116, p. 11913.)

Basically, the answer is "no difference". They are both the same consequences. If Trump is politically toxic enough for GOP congress to throw under the bus - OR to lose the House/Senate majority in midterm elections in 2018 - he will just as likely to be impeached for sneezing out of order as for perjury as for obstruction of justice. As Joseph Stalin Stalin's Chief Prosecutor Vyshinsky stated: "Был бы человек, а статья найдется" ("Give me a man, and I'll find a law to convict him under"). Or, quoting idiomatically, from Wolfe's ""Bonfire of the Vanities": "a grand jury would 'indict a ham sandwich,' if that's what you wanted."

Having said that, purely theoretically, Senate refused to convict William Jefferson Clinton for perjury, so you can make a logical case that perjury consequences can't be any worse than obstruction of justice, since the former can get you off scott free and the latter isn't known (as nobody was ever tried by the Senate on that charge).