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United Nations Policy

You might be interested in the United Nations rules for admission of new members. Although it only applies to a specific recognition, it is one of the few times you will have a bureaucratic process for recognition.

The United Nations process is:

  1. A country must apply for membership. This membership must include a declaration that the applicant accepts the terms of the UN Charter.
  2. The Security Council must recommend the applicant for membership.
  3. The General Assembly can either approve or reject the membership.

Each step is a potential source of failure. Some potential members may not apply (although there are significant incentives for doing so, especially for a state attempting to established its legitimacy). Any member of the Security Council can quash the applicant with a single vote. Finally, even if the Security Council recommends the applicant the General Assembly gets a vote.

More Generally

In general though, there is no formal legal process by which a country becomes recognized internationally. This relies on soft-skills and "reading the room" more than bureaucracy or process.

Sovereignty and Recognition

There are two primary theories of statehood, which are covered in NSNoob's answer. The important takeaway is that sovereignty and recognition are two different ideas, and the theories disagree on how they relate.

Sovereignty is the "supreme authority within a territory" (SEP). A state is sovereign when it has authority in a certain place. This includes the ability to make and enforce laws and the ability to defend its space from others. For declarative theory, this is enough to be a state.

International recognition speaks to the legitimacy of a state, rather than its authority. Recognition by more established states and participation in the international community enhances legitimacy. For constitutive theory, recognition is required for statehood.

United Nations Policy

You might be interested in the United Nations rules for admission of new members. Although it only applies to a specific recognition, it is one of the few times you will have a bureaucratic process for recognition.

The United Nations process is:

  1. A country must apply for membership. This membership must include a declaration that the applicant accepts the terms of the UN Charter.
  2. The Security Council must recommend the applicant for membership.
  3. The General Assembly can either approve or reject the membership.

Each step is a potential source of failure. Some potential members may not apply (although there are significant incentives for doing so, especially for a state attempting to established its legitimacy). Any member of the Security Council can quash the applicant with a single vote. Finally, even if the Security Council recommends the applicant the General Assembly gets a vote.

More Generally

In general though, there is no formal legal process by which a country becomes recognized internationally. This relies on soft-skills and "reading the room" more than bureaucracy or process.

United Nations Policy

You might be interested in the United Nations rules for admission of new members. Although it only applies to a specific recognition, it is one of the few times you will have a bureaucratic process for recognition.

The United Nations process is:

  1. A country must apply for membership. This membership must include a declaration that the applicant accepts the terms of the UN Charter.
  2. The Security Council must recommend the applicant for membership.
  3. The General Assembly can either approve or reject the membership.

Each step is a potential source of failure. Some potential members may not apply (although there are significant incentives for doing so, especially for a state attempting to established its legitimacy). Any member of the Security Council can quash the applicant with a single vote. Finally, even if the Security Council recommends the applicant the General Assembly gets a vote.

More Generally

In general though, there is no formal legal process by which a country becomes recognized internationally. This relies on soft-skills and "reading the room" more than bureaucracy or process.

Sovereignty and Recognition

There are two primary theories of statehood, which are covered in NSNoob's answer. The important takeaway is that sovereignty and recognition are two different ideas, and the theories disagree on how they relate.

Sovereignty is the "supreme authority within a territory" (SEP). A state is sovereign when it has authority in a certain place. This includes the ability to make and enforce laws and the ability to defend its space from others. For declarative theory, this is enough to be a state.

International recognition speaks to the legitimacy of a state, rather than its authority. Recognition by more established states and participation in the international community enhances legitimacy. For constitutive theory, recognition is required for statehood.

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source | link

United Nations Policy

You might be interested in the United Nations rules for admission of new members. Although it only applies to a specific recognition, it is one of the few times you will have a bureaucratic process for recognition.

The United Nations process is:

  1. A country must apply for membership. This membership must include a declaration that the applicant accepts the terms of the UN Charter.
  2. The Security Council must recommend the applicant for membership.
  3. The General Assembly can either approve or reject the membership.

Each step is a potential source of failure. Some potential members may not apply (although there are significant incentives for doing so, especially for a state attempting to established its legitimacy). Any member of the Security Council can quash the applicant with a single vote. Finally, even if the Security Council recommends the applicant the General Assembly gets a vote.

More Generally

In general though, there is no formal legal process by which a country becomes recognized internationally. This relies on soft-skills and "reading the room" more than bureaucracy or process.