2 Updated post, as per comments.
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It is the official government policy of both North Korea and South Korea to unify. This is due to the historical fact that Korea was unified before World War II. Both countries were unified for more than a thousand of years, under various names, including the Greater Korean Empire from 1897 to 1910, Joseon from 1392 to 1897 and Goryeo from 918 to 1392.

Both countries have a shared history and culture. In addition, they have also proclaimed reunification as an eventual goal after the Korean War, signing the 7 · 4 South and North Korea Joint Statement, outlining thethis aim.

It is only in recent years that there are more pressing issuesHowever, such asgiven the recent development of North Korea's nuclear weapon programme, it has made denuclearisation of the Korean peninsular, that makepeninsula a bigger priority than reunification seem impossible.

While reunification may be increasingly difficult now due to the divergence of their economies and social structures, it's worth remembering that they have only been separated for less than a century, as opposed to being unified for a millennium. As such, both the North and the South wouldKorea will not give up their claims of each other, even though it may seem to be difficult in recent years due to the increasing divergence of their economies and social structures.

It is the official government policy of both North Korea and South Korea to unify. This is due to the historical fact that Korea was unified before World War II. Both countries were unified for more than a thousand of years, under various names, including the Greater Korean Empire from 1897 to 1910, Joseon from 1392 to 1897 and Goryeo from 918 to 1392.

Both countries have a shared history and culture. In addition, they have also proclaimed reunification as an eventual goal after the Korean War, signing the 7 · 4 South and North Korea Joint Statement, outlining the aim.

It is only in recent years that there are more pressing issues, such as the denuclearisation of the Korean peninsular, that make reunification seem impossible.

As such, both the North and the South would not give up their claims of each other, even though it may seem to be difficult in recent years due to the increasing divergence of their economies and social structures.

It is the official government policy of both North Korea and South Korea to unify. This is due to the historical fact that Korea was unified before World War II. Both countries were unified for more than a thousand of years, under various names, including the Greater Korean Empire from 1897 to 1910, Joseon from 1392 to 1897 and Goryeo from 918 to 1392.

Both countries have a shared history and culture. In addition, they have also proclaimed reunification as an eventual goal after the Korean War, signing the 7 · 4 South and North Korea Joint Statement, outlining this aim.

However, given the recent development of North Korea's nuclear weapon programme, it has made denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula a bigger priority than reunification.

While reunification may be increasingly difficult now due to the divergence of their economies and social structures, it's worth remembering that they have only been separated for less than a century, as opposed to being unified for a millennium. As such, both North and South Korea will not give up their claims of each other.

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It is the official government policy of both North Korea and South Korea to unify. This is due to the historical fact that Korea was unified before World War II. Both countries were unified for more than a thousand of years, under various names, including the Greater Korean Empire from 1897 to 1910, Joseon from 1392 to 1897 and Goryeo from 918 to 1392.

Both countries have a shared history and culture. In addition, they have also proclaimed reunification as an eventual goal after the Korean War, signing the 7 · 4 South and North Korea Joint Statement, outlining the aim.

It is only in recent years that there are more pressing issues, such as the denuclearisation of the Korean peninsular, that make reunification seem impossible.

As such, both the North and the South would not give up their claims of each other, even though it may seem to be difficult in recent years due to the increasing divergence of their economies and social structures.