Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
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Because by travelling people extend their horizons. By travelling your experience becomes less limited to what you know from your daily life. Even nowadays you can see the example: intolerance towards different people is result of limited perspectives, and people who travel are much less prone to this. They are also less affected by information from media and propaganda. In communism era, there was a lot of propaganda that was complete bullshit. By travelling, people would immediatelly see through it. They would become aware of the oppression. They would also see all the amazing things the western economy provided and that would make them unhappy and more likely to protest (this was also one of the reasons of the 1989 revolution - the economy regulations were unsustainable). By extending their horizons, they would generally become unhappy about the situation. The revolutionary forces would become stronger, which would lead to earlier revolution. The key to success of these regimes is to keep people in lie and false propaganda and false sense that our country is the best place to live for as long as it is possible.The key to success of these regimes is to keep people in lie and false propaganda and false sense that our country is the best place to live for as long as it is possible.

That's for travelling. Another thing is the emmigration. I personally do not much understand why they were so strict about this, people who emmigrate (and do not return) would have at that time much less influence on the regime (remember, those were times without the Internet). But perhaps again, these people staying in touch with their friends and families who stayed there could undermine the picture of perfect country.

Whatever they tried to ban, it didn't work anyway. At least in Czechoslovakia. My uncle, who is a scientist, emmigrated. He went on the organized tour to Turkey and then he escaped, with very little USD (it was illegal to have/trade western currencies). With the help of US embassy in Instanbul, he was safe and under protection. He ended up in refugees camp, and after nine very tough months he finally got to the US. It was tough but he made it. So, there were ways to do it, if you really wanted to.

Because by travelling people extend their horizons. By travelling your experience becomes less limited to what you know from your daily life. Even nowadays you can see the example: intolerance towards different people is result of limited perspectives, and people who travel are much less prone to this. They are also less affected by information from media and propaganda. In communism era, there was a lot of propaganda that was complete bullshit. By travelling, people would immediatelly see through it. They would become aware of the oppression. They would also see all the amazing things the western economy provided and that would make them unhappy and more likely to protest (this was also one of the reasons of the 1989 revolution - the economy regulations were unsustainable). By extending their horizons, they would generally become unhappy about the situation. The revolutionary forces would become stronger, which would lead to earlier revolution. The key to success of these regimes is to keep people in lie and false propaganda and false sense that our country is the best place to live for as long as it is possible.

That's for travelling. Another thing is the emmigration. I personally do not much understand why they were so strict about this, people who emmigrate (and do not return) would have at that time much less influence on the regime (remember, those were times without the Internet). But perhaps again, these people staying in touch with their friends and families who stayed there could undermine the picture of perfect country.

Whatever they tried to ban, it didn't work anyway. At least in Czechoslovakia. My uncle, who is a scientist, emmigrated. He went on the organized tour to Turkey and then he escaped, with very little USD (it was illegal to have/trade western currencies). With the help of US embassy in Instanbul, he was safe and under protection. He ended up in refugees camp, and after nine very tough months he finally got to the US. It was tough but he made it. So, there were ways to do it, if you really wanted to.

Because by travelling people extend their horizons. By travelling your experience becomes less limited to what you know from your daily life. Even nowadays you can see the example: intolerance towards different people is result of limited perspectives, and people who travel are much less prone to this. They are also less affected by information from media and propaganda. In communism era, there was a lot of propaganda that was complete bullshit. By travelling, people would immediatelly see through it. They would become aware of the oppression. They would also see all the amazing things the western economy provided and that would make them unhappy and more likely to protest (this was also one of the reasons of the 1989 revolution - the economy regulations were unsustainable). By extending their horizons, they would generally become unhappy about the situation. The revolutionary forces would become stronger, which would lead to earlier revolution. The key to success of these regimes is to keep people in lie and false propaganda and false sense that our country is the best place to live for as long as it is possible.

That's for travelling. Another thing is the emmigration. I personally do not much understand why they were so strict about this, people who emmigrate (and do not return) would have at that time much less influence on the regime (remember, those were times without the Internet). But perhaps again, these people staying in touch with their friends and families who stayed there could undermine the picture of perfect country.

Whatever they tried to ban, it didn't work anyway. At least in Czechoslovakia. My uncle, who is a scientist, emmigrated. He went on the organized tour to Turkey and then he escaped, with very little USD (it was illegal to have/trade western currencies). With the help of US embassy in Instanbul, he was safe and under protection. He ended up in refugees camp, and after nine very tough months he finally got to the US. It was tough but he made it. So, there were ways to do it, if you really wanted to.

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source | link

Because by travelling people extend their horizons. By travelling your experience becomes less limited to what you know from your daily life. Even nowadays you can see the example: intolerance towards different people is result of limited perspectives, and people who travel are much less prone to this. They are also less affected by information from media and propaganda. In communism era, there was a lot of propaganda that was complete bullshit. By travelling, people would immediatelly see through it. They would become aware of the oppression. They would also see all the amazing things the western economy provided and that would make them unhappy and more likely to protest (this was also one of the reasons of the 1989 revolution - the economy regulations were unsustainable). By extending their horizons, they would generally become unhappy about the situation. The revolutionary forces would become stronger, which would lead to earlier revolution. The key to success of these regimes is to keep people in lie and false propaganda and false sense that our country is the best place to live for as long as it is possible.

That's for travelling. Another thing is the emmigration. I personally do not much understand why they were so strict about this, people who emmigrate (and do not return) would have at that time much less influence on the regime (remember, those were times without the Internet). But perhaps again, these people staying in touch with their friends and families who stayed there could undermine the picture of perfect country.

Whatever they tried to ban, it didn't work anyway. At least in Czechoslovakia. My uncle, who is a scientist, emmigrated. He went on the organized tour to Turkey and then he escaped, with very little USD (it was illegal to have/trade western currencies). With the help of US embassy in Instanbul, he was safe and under protection. He ended up in refugees camp, and after nine very tough months he finally got to the US. It was tough but he made it. So, there were ways to do it, if you really wanted to.