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I wish to provide an answer with a concrete example of why funding pure mathematics is a fruitful endeavor.

I use an application on my Android phone called "Google Maps." It allows me to obtain directions to any place in the world. This application exploits what is called a Global Positioning System (GPS) in which we have satellites that orbit earth while broadcasting their positioning and the time they broadcasted. There is one problem though: Einstein demonstrated that time is a relative phenomenon. Time can be affected by changes in gravity and by increased velocity.  If we don't correct for this issue then the satellites give faulty readings and eventually Google Maps stops working all together.

The concept of general relativity was necessary in order to correct the time that the GPS satellites were reading. Albert Einstein's work in Theoretical Physics turned out to have a very real application and the precise mathematical equations he worked out did have a very useful application.

I wasn't asked to defend Theoretical physics. Why bring up Einstein? Because Einstein didn't work in a vacuum. He took heavy influence from a (Pure?) Mathematician by the name of Bernard Riemann whose construction of Riemannian Geometry laid the groundwork for general relativity. I am pretty sure Riemann's motivations for studying these questions were academic. In other words a project that was once pure mathematics became an application which helped society.

This is my favorite story but by far not the only example of how pure mathematics impacts the research infrastructure. I remember the poster bringing up Hardy's quote about number theory. Well sorry to say but number theory is now applied in encryption software to help us fight against the data breaches. Pure mathematics lays the groundwork for future projects to succeed.

I wish to provide an answer with a concrete example of why funding pure mathematics is a fruitful endeavor.

I use an application on my Android phone called "Google Maps." It allows me to obtain directions to any place in the world. This application exploits what is called a Global Positioning System (GPS) in which we have satellites that orbit earth while broadcasting their positioning and the time they broadcasted. There is one problem though: Einstein demonstrated that time is a relative phenomenon. Time can be affected by changes in gravity and by increased velocity.  

The concept of general relativity was necessary in order to correct the time that the GPS satellites were reading. Albert Einstein's work in Theoretical Physics turned out to have a very real application and the precise mathematical equations he worked out did have a very useful application.

I wasn't asked to defend Theoretical physics. Why bring up Einstein? Because Einstein didn't work in a vacuum. He took heavy influence from a (Pure?) Mathematician by the name of Bernard Riemann whose construction of Riemannian Geometry laid the groundwork for general relativity. I am pretty sure Riemann's motivations for studying these questions were academic. In other words a project that was once pure mathematics became an application which helped society.

This is my favorite story but by far not the only example of how pure mathematics impacts the research infrastructure. I remember the poster bringing up Hardy's quote about number theory. Well sorry to say but number theory is now applied in encryption software to help us fight against the data breaches. Pure mathematics lays the groundwork for future projects to succeed.

I wish to provide an answer with a concrete example of why funding pure mathematics is a fruitful endeavor.

I use an application on my Android phone called "Google Maps." It allows me to obtain directions to any place in the world. This application exploits what is called a Global Positioning System (GPS) in which we have satellites that orbit earth while broadcasting their positioning and the time they broadcasted. There is one problem though: Einstein demonstrated that time is a relative phenomenon. Time can be affected by changes in gravity and by increased velocity. If we don't correct for this issue then the satellites give faulty readings and eventually Google Maps stops working all together.

The concept of general relativity was necessary in order to correct the time that the GPS satellites were reading. Albert Einstein's work in Theoretical Physics turned out to have a very real application and the precise mathematical equations he worked out did have a very useful application.

I wasn't asked to defend Theoretical physics. Why bring up Einstein? Because Einstein didn't work in a vacuum. He took heavy influence from a (Pure?) Mathematician by the name of Bernard Riemann whose construction of Riemannian Geometry laid the groundwork for general relativity. I am pretty sure Riemann's motivations for studying these questions were academic. In other words a project that was once pure mathematics became an application which helped society.

This is my favorite story but by far not the only example of how pure mathematics impacts the research infrastructure. I remember the poster bringing up Hardy's quote about number theory. Well sorry to say but number theory is now applied in encryption software to help us fight against the data breaches. Pure mathematics lays the groundwork for future projects to succeed.

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I wish to provide an answer with a concrete example of why funding pure mathematics is a fruitful endeavor.

I use an application on my Android phone called "Google Maps." It allows me to obtain directions to any place in the world. This application exploits what is called a Global Positioning System (GPS) in which we have satellites that orbit earth while broadcasting their positioning and the time they broadcasted. There is one problem though: Einstein demonstrated that time is a relative phenomenon. Time can be affected by changes in gravity and by increased velocity.

The concept of general relativity was necessary in order to correct the time that the GPS satellites were reading. Albert Einstein's work in Theoretical Physics turned out to have a very real application and the precise mathematical equations he worked out did have a very useful application.

I wasn't asked to defend Theoretical physics. Why bring up Einstein? Because Einstein didn't work in a vacuum. He took heavy influence from a (Pure?) Mathematician by the name of Bernard Riemann whose construction of Riemannian Geometry laid the groundwork for general relativity. I am pretty sure Riemann's motivations for studying these questions were academic. In other words a project that was once pure mathematics became an application which helped society.

This is my favorite story but by far not the only example of how pure mathematics impacts the research infrastructure. I remember the poster bringing up Hardy's quote about number theory. Well sorry to say but number theory is now applied in encryption software to help us fight against the data breaches. Pure mathematics lays the groundwork for future projects to succeed.