3 Minor improvements
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For many countries, the decision to attend or not is deferred to the national football association. The countries that you mention don't require exit visas, so it would require an exceptional act to prevent the football players from attending the World Cup in Russia. The government can attempt to influence the football association, but it is not a matter for the government, except in exceptional circumstances.

For the government to use its soft power to influence the football association would be tremendously unpopular with a large number of people. There There is a notion that "politics should be kept out of sport". Even during the height of the Cold War, when relations between Russia and the West were much, much worse, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Australia all attended the Moscow Olympics. (Japan, however, did follow a USU.S. boycott)

The current Western sanctions on Russia are clearly defined and described. They don't just say "don't help the Russians". They do not cover, and are not intended to cover all economic activity. They do not cover sporting events.

Doubtless many Western leaders would have preferred one of the other bidding groups (England, Spain/PortugaulPortugal, Belgium/Netherlands) to be hosting the tournament. But to stop the national football team from playing would (in, in the words of "Sir Humphrey")Sir Humphrey, be a couragous decision)"a courageous decision".

For many countries the decision to attend or not is deferred to the national football association. The countries that you mention don't require exit visas, so it would require an exceptional act to prevent the football players from attending Russia. The government can attempt to influence the football association, but it is not a matter for the government, except in exceptional circumstances.

For the government to use its soft power to influence the football association would be tremendously unpopular with a large number of people. There is a notion that "politics should be kept out of sport". Even during the height of the Cold War, when relations between Russia and the West were much much worse, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Australia all attended the Moscow Olympics. (Japan did follow a US boycott)

The current Western sanctions on Russia are clearly defined and described. They don't just say "don't help the Russians". They do not cover, and are not intended to cover all economic activity. They do not cover sporting events.

Doubtless many Western leaders would have preferred one of the other bidding groups (England, Spain/Portugaul, Belgium/Netherlands) to be hosting the tournament. But to stop the national football team from playing would (in the words of "Sir Humphrey") be a couragous decision)

For many countries, the decision to attend or not is deferred to the national football association. The countries that you mention don't require exit visas, so it would require an exceptional act to prevent the football players from attending the World Cup in Russia. The government can attempt to influence the football association, but it is not a matter for the government, except in exceptional circumstances.

For the government to use its soft power to influence the football association would be tremendously unpopular with a large number of people. There is a notion that "politics should be kept out of sport". Even during the height of the Cold War, when relations between Russia and the West were much, much worse, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Australia all attended the Moscow Olympics. (Japan, however, did follow a U.S. boycott)

The current Western sanctions on Russia are clearly defined and described. They don't just say "don't help the Russians". They do not cover, and are not intended to cover all economic activity. They do not cover sporting events.

Doubtless many Western leaders would have preferred one of the other bidding groups (England, Spain/Portugal, Belgium/Netherlands) to be hosting the tournament. But to stop the national football team from playing would, in the words of Sir Humphrey, be "a courageous decision".

2 added 4 characters in body
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For many countries the decision to attend or not is deferred to the national football association. The countries that you mention don't require exit visas, so it would require an exceptional act to prevent the football players from attending Russia. The government can attempt to influence the football association, but it is not a matter for the government, except in exceptional circumstances.

For the government to use its soft power to influence the football association would be tremendously unpopular with a large number of people. There is a notion that "politics should be kept out of sport". Even during the height of the Cold War, when relations between Russia and the West were much much worse, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Australia all attended the Moscow Olympics. (Japan did follow a US boycott)

The current Western sanctions on Russia are clearly defined and described. They don't just say "don't help the Russians". They do not cover, and are not intended to cover all economic activity. They do not cover sporting events.

Doubtless many Western leaders would have preferred one of the other bidding groups (England, Spain/Portugaul, Belgium/Netherlands) to be hosting the tournament. But to stop the national football team from playing would (in the words of "Sir Humphrey") be a bravecouragous decision)

For many countries the decision to attend or not is deferred to the national football association. The countries that you mention don't require exit visas, so it would require an exceptional act to prevent the football players from attending Russia. The government can attempt to influence the football association, but it is not a matter for the government, except in exceptional circumstances.

For the government to use its soft power to influence the football association would be tremendously unpopular with a large number of people. There is a notion that "politics should be kept out of sport". Even during the height of the Cold War, when relations between Russia and the West were much much worse, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Australia all attended the Moscow Olympics. (Japan did follow a US boycott)

The current Western sanctions on Russia are clearly defined and described. They don't just say "don't help the Russians". They do not cover, and are not intended to cover all economic activity. They do not cover sporting events.

Doubtless many Western leaders would have preferred one of the other bidding groups (England, Spain/Portugaul, Belgium/Netherlands) to be hosting the tournament. But to stop the national football team from playing would (in the words of "Sir Humphrey") be a brave decision)

For many countries the decision to attend or not is deferred to the national football association. The countries that you mention don't require exit visas, so it would require an exceptional act to prevent the football players from attending Russia. The government can attempt to influence the football association, but it is not a matter for the government, except in exceptional circumstances.

For the government to use its soft power to influence the football association would be tremendously unpopular with a large number of people. There is a notion that "politics should be kept out of sport". Even during the height of the Cold War, when relations between Russia and the West were much much worse, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Australia all attended the Moscow Olympics. (Japan did follow a US boycott)

The current Western sanctions on Russia are clearly defined and described. They don't just say "don't help the Russians". They do not cover, and are not intended to cover all economic activity. They do not cover sporting events.

Doubtless many Western leaders would have preferred one of the other bidding groups (England, Spain/Portugaul, Belgium/Netherlands) to be hosting the tournament. But to stop the national football team from playing would (in the words of "Sir Humphrey") be a couragous decision)

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For many countries the decision to attend or not is deferred to the national football association. The countries that you mention don't require exit visas, so it would require an exceptional act to prevent the football players from attending Russia. The government can attempt to influence the football association, but it is not a matter for the government, except in exceptional circumstances.

For the government to use its soft power to influence the football association would be tremendously unpopular with a large number of people. There is a notion that "politics should be kept out of sport". Even during the height of the Cold War, when relations between Russia and the West were much much worse, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Australia all attended the Moscow Olympics. (Japan did follow a US boycott)

The current Western sanctions on Russia are clearly defined and described. They don't just say "don't help the Russians". They do not cover, and are not intended to cover all economic activity. They do not cover sporting events.

Doubtless many Western leaders would have preferred one of the other bidding groups (England, Spain/Portugaul, Belgium/Netherlands) to be hosting the tournament. But to stop the national football team from playing would (in the words of "Sir Humphrey") be a brave decision)