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Northern Ireland is a net recipient rather than contributor to the UK economy (Scotland and Wales are too actually). It takes more money than it contributes. England is the wealthiest country in the UK, followed by Scotland, then NI, then Wales.

It's also deeply divided between nationalists and unionists. Half of the population does not seesees itself as British, not Irish, the other half does not seesees itself as Irish, not British. While Irish people in the Republic of Ireland would like to have a united island for cultural and historical reasons, they are well aware of the potential economic impacts of reunification with the North. AndIt's an open question as to whether NI would be a net contributor or drain on the Republic of Ireland's economy, so for the Republic, it's a mix of cultural, historic and economic factors. The UK, in all honesty, would probably be glad to be rid of it, it's something of a troublesome burden that the UK was forced to bear due to its colonial history. While it is a net recipient, it's still a very small one, with a very small population, so it's hardly a major economic burden to the UK.

Most British people I know see NI has a red headed stepchild. It's actually a lovely place btw, Belfast is a beautiful city, it's where the Titanic was built, there's a great Titanic museum there, and the North scenes in Game of Thrones were filmed there, and it has some amazing scenery like the Giant's Causeway. But a lot of people in the UK still think of Northern Ireland and think terrorism (specifically the IRA, they are unaware of UVF unionist terrorism), but there's much more to NI than that. The (nominally) Catholic and thus Nationalist population of Irish descent in NI is growing however, and identify more strongly as Irish than British. A mix of nationalism and dissatisfaction with Brexit could push this small majority strongly towards reunification. And I can't see there being much push back from mainland UK these days.

So really, it comes down to whether the Irish Republic wants to reunify, and the opposition of the large Unionist minority of Scottish and English descent in NI who would bitterly oppose reunification for cultural and historic reasons. Even they may be swayed by the advantages of staying in the EU, though Ireland doesn't yet have an NHS, and the UK does, that and the investment from the UK government, which is probably more than what the Republic's government would be willing to invest, are the strongest reasons to remain in the UK.

In my opinion, it's really just a matter of time until NI reunifiesprobably will reunify with the rest of Ireland at some stage, especially as Ireland becomes more secular, the Catholic/Protestant divide becomes less significant. Younger generations are VERY secular agnostic/atheist. We have to keep in mind though, it really isn't that long ago that Belfast was a warzone. It has rapidly changed, but we're talking 20 years ago, not ancient history. It's a very sensitive subject. It's still much too early in my opinion.

Northern Ireland is a net recipient rather than contributor to the UK economy (Scotland and Wales are too actually). It takes more money than it contributes. England is the wealthiest country in the UK, followed by Scotland, then NI, then Wales.

It's also deeply divided between nationalists and unionists. Half of the population does not see itself as Irish, half does not see itself as British. While Irish people in the Republic of Ireland would like to have a united island for cultural and historical reasons, they are well aware of the potential economic impacts of reunification with the North. And the UK, in all honesty, would probably be glad to be rid of it, it's something of a troublesome burden that the UK was forced to bear due to its colonial history.

Most British people I know see NI has a red headed stepchild. It's actually a lovely place btw, Belfast is a beautiful city, it's where the Titanic was built, there's a great Titanic museum there, and the North scenes in Game of Thrones were filmed there, and has some amazing scenery like the Giant's Causeway. But a lot of people in the UK still think of Northern Ireland and think terrorism (specifically the IRA, they are unaware of UVF unionist terrorism), but there's much more to NI than that. The (nominally) Catholic and thus Nationalist population of NI is growing however, and identify more strongly as Irish than British. A mix of nationalism and dissatisfaction with Brexit could push this small majority strongly towards reunification. And I can't see there being much push back from mainland UK these days.

So really, it comes down to whether the Irish Republic wants to reunify, and the opposition of the large Unionist minority in NI who would bitterly oppose reunification for cultural and historic reasons. Even they may be swayed by the advantages of staying in the EU, though Ireland doesn't yet have an NHS, and the UK does, that and the investment from the UK government, which is probably more than what the Republic's government would be willing to invest, are the strongest reasons to remain in the UK.

In my opinion, it's really just a matter of time until NI reunifies with the rest of Ireland. We have to keep in mind though, it really isn't that long ago that Belfast was a warzone. It has rapidly changed, but we're talking 20 years ago, not ancient history. It's a very sensitive subject.

Northern Ireland is a net recipient rather than contributor to the UK economy (Scotland and Wales are too actually). It takes more money than it contributes. England is the wealthiest country in the UK, followed by Scotland, then NI, then Wales.

It's also deeply divided between nationalists and unionists. Half of the population sees itself as British, not Irish, the other half sees itself as Irish, not British. While Irish people in the Republic of Ireland would like to have a united island for cultural and historical reasons, they are well aware of the potential economic impacts of reunification with the North. It's an open question as to whether NI would be a net contributor or drain on the Republic of Ireland's economy, so for the Republic, it's a mix of cultural, historic and economic factors. The UK, in all honesty, would probably be glad to be rid of it, it's something of a troublesome burden that the UK was forced to bear due to its colonial history. While it is a net recipient, it's still a very small one, with a very small population, so it's hardly a major economic burden to the UK.

Most British people I know see NI has a red headed stepchild. It's actually a lovely place btw, Belfast is a beautiful city, it's where the Titanic was built, there's a great Titanic museum there, and the North scenes in Game of Thrones were filmed there, and it has some amazing scenery like the Giant's Causeway. But a lot of people in the UK still think of Northern Ireland and think terrorism (specifically the IRA, they are unaware of UVF unionist terrorism), but there's much more to NI than that. The (nominally) Catholic and thus Nationalist population of Irish descent in NI is growing however, and identify more strongly as Irish than British. A mix of nationalism and dissatisfaction with Brexit could push this small majority strongly towards reunification. And I can't see there being much push back from mainland UK these days.

So really, it comes down to whether the Irish Republic wants to reunify, and the opposition of the large Unionist minority of Scottish and English descent in NI who would bitterly oppose reunification for cultural and historic reasons. Even they may be swayed by the advantages of staying in the EU, though Ireland doesn't yet have an NHS, and the UK does, that and the investment from the UK government, which is probably more than what the Republic's government would be willing to invest, are the strongest reasons to remain in the UK.

In my opinion, NI probably will reunify with the rest of Ireland at some stage, especially as Ireland becomes more secular, the Catholic/Protestant divide becomes less significant. Younger generations are VERY secular agnostic/atheist. We have to keep in mind though, it really isn't that long ago that Belfast was a warzone. It has rapidly changed, but we're talking 20 years ago, not ancient history. It's a very sensitive subject. It's still much too early in my opinion.

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Northern Ireland is a net recipient rather than contributor to the UK economy (Scotland and Wales are too actually). It takes more money than it contributes. England is the wealthiest country in the UK, followed by Scotland, then NI, then Wales.

It's also deeply divided between nationalists and unionists. Half of the population does not see itself as Irish, half does not see itself as British. While Irish people in the Republic of Ireland would like to have a united island for cultural and historical reasons, they are well aware of the potential economic impacts of reunification with the North. And the UK, in all honesty, would probably be glad to be rid of it, it's something of a troublesome burden that the UK was forced to bear due to it'sits colonial history.

Most British people I know see NI has a red headed stepchild. It's actually a lovely place btw, Belfast is a beautiful city, it's where the Titanic was built, there's a great Titanic museum there, and the North scenes in Game of Thrones were filmed there, and has some amazing scenery like the Giant's Causeway. But a lot of people in the UK still think of Northern Ireland and think terrorism (specifically the IRA, they are unaware of UVF unionist terrorism), but there's much more to NI than that. The (nominally) Catholic and thus Nationalist population of NI is growing however, and identify more strongly as Irish than British. A mix of nationalism and dissatisfaction with Brexit could push this small majority strongly towards reunification. And I can't see there being much push back from mainland UK these days.

So really, it comes down to whether the Irish Republic wants to reunify, and the opposition of the large Unionist minority in NI who would bitterly oppose reunification for cultural and historic reasons. Even they may be swayed by the advantages of staying in the EU, though Ireland doesn't yet have an NHS, and the UK does, that and the investment from the UK government, which is probably more than what the Republic's government would be willing to invest, are the strongest reasons to remain in the UK.

In my opinion, it's really just a matter of time until NI reunifies with the rest of Ireland. We have to keep in mind though, it really isn't that long ago that Belfast was a warzone. It has rapidly changed, but we're talking 20 years ago, not ancient history. It's a very sensitive subject.

Northern Ireland is a net recipient rather than contributor to the UK economy (Scotland and Wales are too actually). It takes more money than it contributes. England is the wealthiest country in the UK, followed by Scotland, then NI, then Wales.

It's also deeply divided between nationalists and unionists. Half of the population does not see itself as Irish, half does not see itself as British. While Irish people in the Republic of Ireland would like to have a united island for cultural and historical reasons, they are well aware of the potential economic impacts of reunification with the North. And the UK, in all honesty, would probably be glad to be rid of it, it's something of a troublesome burden that the UK was forced to bear due to it's colonial history.

Most British people I know see NI has a red headed stepchild. It's actually a lovely place btw, Belfast is a beautiful city, it's where the Titanic was built, there's a great Titanic museum there, and the North scenes in Game of Thrones were filmed there, and has some amazing scenery like the Giant's Causeway. But a lot of people in the UK still think of Northern Ireland and think terrorism (specifically the IRA, they are unaware of UVF unionist terrorism), but there's much more to NI than that. The (nominally) Catholic and thus Nationalist population of NI is growing however, and identify more strongly as Irish than British. A mix of nationalism and dissatisfaction with Brexit could push this small majority strongly towards reunification. And I can't see there being much push back from mainland UK these days.

So really, it comes down to whether the Irish Republic wants to reunify, and the opposition of the large Unionist minority in NI who would bitterly oppose reunification for cultural and historic reasons. Even they may be swayed by the advantages of staying in the EU, though Ireland doesn't yet have an NHS, and the UK does, that and the investment from the UK government, which is probably more than what the Republic's government would be willing to invest, are the strongest reasons to remain in the UK.

In my opinion, it's really just a matter of time until NI reunifies with the rest of Ireland. We have to keep in mind though, it really isn't that long ago that Belfast was a warzone. It has rapidly changed, but we're talking 20 years ago, not ancient history. It's a very sensitive subject.

Northern Ireland is a net recipient rather than contributor to the UK economy (Scotland and Wales are too actually). It takes more money than it contributes. England is the wealthiest country in the UK, followed by Scotland, then NI, then Wales.

It's also deeply divided between nationalists and unionists. Half of the population does not see itself as Irish, half does not see itself as British. While Irish people in the Republic of Ireland would like to have a united island for cultural and historical reasons, they are well aware of the potential economic impacts of reunification with the North. And the UK, in all honesty, would probably be glad to be rid of it, it's something of a troublesome burden that the UK was forced to bear due to its colonial history.

Most British people I know see NI has a red headed stepchild. It's actually a lovely place btw, Belfast is a beautiful city, it's where the Titanic was built, there's a great Titanic museum there, and the North scenes in Game of Thrones were filmed there, and has some amazing scenery like the Giant's Causeway. But a lot of people in the UK still think of Northern Ireland and think terrorism (specifically the IRA, they are unaware of UVF unionist terrorism), but there's much more to NI than that. The (nominally) Catholic and thus Nationalist population of NI is growing however, and identify more strongly as Irish than British. A mix of nationalism and dissatisfaction with Brexit could push this small majority strongly towards reunification. And I can't see there being much push back from mainland UK these days.

So really, it comes down to whether the Irish Republic wants to reunify, and the opposition of the large Unionist minority in NI who would bitterly oppose reunification for cultural and historic reasons. Even they may be swayed by the advantages of staying in the EU, though Ireland doesn't yet have an NHS, and the UK does, that and the investment from the UK government, which is probably more than what the Republic's government would be willing to invest, are the strongest reasons to remain in the UK.

In my opinion, it's really just a matter of time until NI reunifies with the rest of Ireland. We have to keep in mind though, it really isn't that long ago that Belfast was a warzone. It has rapidly changed, but we're talking 20 years ago, not ancient history. It's a very sensitive subject.

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Northern Ireland is a net recipient rather than contributor to the UK economy (Scotland and Wales are too actually). It takes more money than it contributes. England is the wealthiest country in the UK, followed by Scotland, then NI, then Wales.

It's also deeply divided between nationalists and unionists. Half of the population does not see itself as Irish, half does not see itself as British. While Irish people in the Republic of Ireland would like to have a united island for cultural and historical reasons, they are well aware of the potential economic impacts of reunification with the North. And the UK, in all honesty, would probably be glad to be rid of it, it's something of a troublesome burden that the UK was forced to bear due to it's colonial history.

Most British people I know see NI has a red headed stepchild. It's actually a lovely place btw, Belfast is a beautiful city, it's where the Titanic was built, there's a great Titanic museum there, and the North scenes in Game of Thrones waswere filmed there, and has some amazing scenery like the Giant's Causeway. But a lot of people in the UK still think of Northern Ireland and think terrorism (specifically the IRA, they are unaware of UVF unionist terrorism), but there's much more to NI than that. The (nominally) Catholic and thus Nationalist population of NI is growing however, and identify more strongly as Irish than British. A mix of nationalism and dissatisfaction with Brexit could push this small majority strongly towards reunification. And I can't see there being much push back from mainland UK these days.

So really, it comes down to whether the Irish Republic wants to reunify, and the opposition of the large Unionist minority in NI who would bitterly oppose reunification for cultural and historic reasons. Even they may be swayed by the advantages of staying in the EU, though Ireland doesn't yet have an NHS, and the UK does, that and the investment from the UK government, which is probably more than what the Republic's government would be willing to invest, are the strongest reasons to remain in the UK.

In my opinion, it's really just a matter of time until NI reunifies with the rest of Ireland. We have to keep in mind though, it really isn't that long ago that Belfast was a warzone. It has rapidly changed, but we're talking 20 years ago, not ancient history. It's a very sensitive subject.

Northern Ireland is a net recipient rather than contributor to the UK economy (Scotland and Wales are too actually). It takes more money than it contributes. England is the wealthiest country in the UK, followed by Scotland, then NI, then Wales.

It's also deeply divided between nationalists and unionists. Half of the population does not see itself as Irish, half does not see itself as British. While Irish people in the Republic of Ireland would like to have a united island for cultural and historical reasons, they are well aware of the potential economic impacts of reunification with the North. And the UK, in all honesty, would probably be glad to be rid of it, it's something of a troublesome burden that the UK was forced to bear due to it's colonial history.

Most British people I know see NI has a red headed stepchild. It's actually a lovely place btw, Belfast is a beautiful city, it's where Game of Thrones was filmed, and has some amazing scenery like the Giant's Causeway. But a lot of people in the UK still think of Northern Ireland and think terrorism (specifically the IRA, they are unaware of UVF unionist terrorism), but there's much more to NI than that. The (nominally) Catholic and thus Nationalist population of NI is growing however, and identify more strongly as Irish than British. A mix of nationalism and dissatisfaction with Brexit could push this small majority strongly towards reunification. And I can't see there being much push back from mainland UK these days.

So really, it comes down to whether the Irish Republic wants to reunify, and the opposition of the large Unionist minority in NI who would bitterly oppose reunification for cultural and historic reasons. Even they may be swayed by the advantages of staying in the EU, though Ireland doesn't yet have an NHS, and the UK does, that and the investment from the UK government, which is probably more than what the Republic's government would be willing to invest, are the strongest reasons to remain in the UK.

In my opinion, it's really just a matter of time until NI reunifies with the rest of Ireland. We have to keep in mind though, it really isn't that long ago that Belfast was a warzone. It has rapidly changed, but we're talking 20 years ago, not ancient history. It's a very sensitive subject.

Northern Ireland is a net recipient rather than contributor to the UK economy (Scotland and Wales are too actually). It takes more money than it contributes. England is the wealthiest country in the UK, followed by Scotland, then NI, then Wales.

It's also deeply divided between nationalists and unionists. Half of the population does not see itself as Irish, half does not see itself as British. While Irish people in the Republic of Ireland would like to have a united island for cultural and historical reasons, they are well aware of the potential economic impacts of reunification with the North. And the UK, in all honesty, would probably be glad to be rid of it, it's something of a troublesome burden that the UK was forced to bear due to it's colonial history.

Most British people I know see NI has a red headed stepchild. It's actually a lovely place btw, Belfast is a beautiful city, it's where the Titanic was built, there's a great Titanic museum there, and the North scenes in Game of Thrones were filmed there, and has some amazing scenery like the Giant's Causeway. But a lot of people in the UK still think of Northern Ireland and think terrorism (specifically the IRA, they are unaware of UVF unionist terrorism), but there's much more to NI than that. The (nominally) Catholic and thus Nationalist population of NI is growing however, and identify more strongly as Irish than British. A mix of nationalism and dissatisfaction with Brexit could push this small majority strongly towards reunification. And I can't see there being much push back from mainland UK these days.

So really, it comes down to whether the Irish Republic wants to reunify, and the opposition of the large Unionist minority in NI who would bitterly oppose reunification for cultural and historic reasons. Even they may be swayed by the advantages of staying in the EU, though Ireland doesn't yet have an NHS, and the UK does, that and the investment from the UK government, which is probably more than what the Republic's government would be willing to invest, are the strongest reasons to remain in the UK.

In my opinion, it's really just a matter of time until NI reunifies with the rest of Ireland. We have to keep in mind though, it really isn't that long ago that Belfast was a warzone. It has rapidly changed, but we're talking 20 years ago, not ancient history. It's a very sensitive subject.

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