added 28 characters in body
Source Link
LаngLаngС
  • 4.9k
  • 2
  • 18
  • 36

Let's stop here and remind us of the effect of figure–ground (perception) as applied to newnews bits and anecdotal statistics from the top of a head. Let's
Let's instead ask "where's the beef"?

Let's stop here and remind us of the effect of figure–ground (perception) as applied to new bits and anecdotal statistics. Let's instead ask "where's the beef"?

Let's stop here and remind us of the effect of figure–ground (perception) as applied to news bits and anecdotal statistics from the top of a head.
Let's instead ask "where's the beef"?

added 64 characters in body
Source Link
LаngLаngС
  • 4.9k
  • 2
  • 18
  • 36

Otherwise the real question to be answered would be "why do we have the impression of 'dictators being talkative in speeches'"? –– Or: "What are pros and cons for anyone giving a long speech?"

Otherwise the real question to be answered would be "why do we have the impression of 'dictators being talkative in speeches'"?

Otherwise the real question to be answered would be "why do we have the impression of 'dictators being talkative in speeches'"? –– Or: "What are pros and cons for anyone giving a long speech?"

added 1916 characters in body
Source Link
LаngLаngС
  • 4.9k
  • 2
  • 18
  • 36

Dig through the archives for Castro's speeches. Then explain why for example his speech at Mass Rally Held Santiago De Cuba 1959–12–01 should be counted as 'dictatorially typically long', as it's only 473 words long?

Let's topstop here and remind us of the effect of figure–ground (perception) as applied to new bits and anecdotal statistics. Let's instead ask "where's the beef"?

Are dictators really long winded speakers on average or on median speech length? Compared to other orators? Systematically enough to even establish a significant correlation?

Gavin Newsom, mayor of San Francisco, liked to speak on "The State of the City. Well, as mayor he had to? But did he really have to do that for 8 hours? Just because he is such a dictator?

This answer maintains that it's needed to establish "it is like that" before starting to explain "why"!

After looking around quite a bit, I didn't find any one such statistic. But quite a lot of counterexamples.

 

This is intended to be a frame-challenge, or in different words an answer maintains that it's neededattempts to establish "it isput the question from head to its feet.

Coming straight from the question as asked: It seems to be just the other way around: the premise needs a more solid base to convince anyone on a factual angle, not just from impressions based on watching news and remembering some isolated records, like that" before startingCastro, and then jumping to explain "why"!generalisation from there.

Above I just list examples that show "no fit". If that reduces your conviction on "valid premise", the first step is taken.

Someone needs to provide a convincing statistic that establishes baseline. A baseline on dictators speaking longer on average compared to western democratic leaders?

Otherwise the real question to be answered would be "why do we have the impression of 'dictators being talkative in speeches'"?

In light of the conflicting information provided above, that would dispute the base claim, the answer here seems to be that Trump or Newsom are reported with the attributes "president" or "mayor", if not just by names only. While foreign leaders with such a bad standing to current leadership in ones own country are labelled "dictator", consequently, and as such this framing and connection of two concepts "dictator" and "long speech" re-inforce a cognitive bias that now begs for explanation, even if reality would not warrant such an investigation.

Let's top here and remind us of the effect of figure–ground (perception) as applied to new bits and anecdotal statistics. Let's instead ask "where's the beef"?

Are dictators really long winded speakers on average or on median speech length? Compared to other orators?

Gavin Newsom, mayor of San Francisco, liked to speak on "The State of the City. Well, as mayor he had to? But did he really have to do that for 8 hours? Just because he is such a dictator?

This answer maintains that it's needed to establish "it is like that" before starting to explain "why"!

Dig through the archives for Castro's speeches. Then explain why for example his speech at Mass Rally Held Santiago De Cuba 1959–12–01 should be counted as 'dictatorially typically long', as it's only 473 words long?

Let's stop here and remind us of the effect of figure–ground (perception) as applied to new bits and anecdotal statistics. Let's instead ask "where's the beef"?

Are dictators really long winded speakers on average or on median speech length? Compared to other orators? Systematically enough to even establish a significant correlation?

Gavin Newsom, mayor of San Francisco, liked to speak on "The State of the City. Well, as mayor he had to? But did he really have to do that for 8 hours? Just because he is such a dictator?

This answer maintains that it's needed to establish "it is like that" before starting to explain "why"!

After looking around quite a bit, I didn't find any one such statistic. But quite a lot of counterexamples.

 

This is intended to be a frame-challenge, or in different words an answer that attempts to put the question from head to its feet.

Coming straight from the question as asked: It seems to be just the other way around: the premise needs a more solid base to convince anyone on a factual angle, not just from impressions based on watching news and remembering some isolated records, like Castro, and then jumping to generalisation from there.

Above I just list examples that show "no fit". If that reduces your conviction on "valid premise", the first step is taken.

Someone needs to provide a convincing statistic that establishes baseline. A baseline on dictators speaking longer on average compared to western democratic leaders?

Otherwise the real question to be answered would be "why do we have the impression of 'dictators being talkative in speeches'"?

In light of the conflicting information provided above, that would dispute the base claim, the answer here seems to be that Trump or Newsom are reported with the attributes "president" or "mayor", if not just by names only. While foreign leaders with such a bad standing to current leadership in ones own country are labelled "dictator", consequently, and as such this framing and connection of two concepts "dictator" and "long speech" re-inforce a cognitive bias that now begs for explanation, even if reality would not warrant such an investigation.

added 247 characters in body
Source Link
LаngLаngС
  • 4.9k
  • 2
  • 18
  • 36
Loading
added 2663 characters in body
Source Link
LаngLаngС
  • 4.9k
  • 2
  • 18
  • 36
Loading
Source Link
LаngLаngС
  • 4.9k
  • 2
  • 18
  • 36
Loading