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The date on which the United Kingdom ceases to be a member state of the European Union can be extended, by a procedure described in section 3 of Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union:

  1. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend this period.

The negotiating period has already been extended twice, and lawfully can be extended again provided all EU member states agree.

We can speculate as to whether there will be a unanimous verdict to extend the period from the European Council - the. The current belief amongst most peopleprevailing wisdom in the UK is that major political changes in the UK will be required for such an extension to be granted, as it is unlikely that all EU Member states will agree to an extension without there being a clear purpose for said extension, and a path forward to break the political deadlock in the UK (likely a referendum of general election). It is, however, entirely possible for suchThe more prevalent belief within the EU seems to be that an extension towould be granted fairly easily without condition, to avoid the economic toll of an exit without any deal.

The date on which the United Kingdom ceases to be a member state of the European Union can be extended, by a procedure described in section 3 of Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union:

  1. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend this period.

The negotiating period has already been extended twice, and lawfully can be extended again provided all EU member states agree.

We can speculate as to whether there will be a unanimous verdict to extend the period from the European Council - the current belief amongst most people is that major political changes in the UK will be required for such an extension to be granted, as it is unlikely that all EU Member states will agree to an extension without there being a clear purpose for said extension, and a path forward to break the political deadlock in the UK (likely a referendum of general election). It is, however, entirely possible for such an extension to be granted.

The date on which the United Kingdom ceases to be a member state of the European Union can be extended, by a procedure described in section 3 of Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union:

  1. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend this period.

The negotiating period has already been extended twice, and lawfully can be extended again provided all EU member states agree.

We can speculate as to whether there will be a unanimous verdict to extend the period from the European Council. The current prevailing wisdom in the UK is that major political changes in the UK will be required for such an extension to be granted, as it is unlikely that all EU Member states will agree to an extension without there being a clear purpose for said extension, and a path forward to break the political deadlock in the UK (likely a referendum of general election). The more prevalent belief within the EU seems to be that an extension would be granted fairly easily without condition, to avoid the economic toll of an exit without any deal.

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source | link

The date on which the United Kingdom ceases to be a member state of the European Union can be extended, by a procedure described in section 3 of Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union:

  1. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend this period.

The negotiating period has already been extended twice, and lawfully can be extended again provided all EU member states agree.

We can speculate as to whether theirthere will be a unanimous verdict to extend the period from the European Council - the current belief amongst most people is that major political changes in the UK will be required for such an extension to be granted, as it is unlikely that all EU Member states will agree to an extension without there being a clear purpose for said extension, and a path forward to break the political deadlock in the UK (likely a referendum of general election). It is, however, entirely possible for such an extension to be granted.

The date on which the United Kingdom ceases to be a member state of the European Union can be extended, by a procedure described in section 3 of Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union:

  1. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend this period.

The negotiating period has already been extended twice, and lawfully can be extended again provided all EU member states agree.

We can speculate as to whether their will be a unanimous verdict to extend the period from the European Council - the current belief amongst most people is that major political changes in the UK will be required for such an extension to be granted, as it is unlikely that all EU Member states will agree to an extension without there being a clear purpose for said extension, and a path forward to break the political deadlock in the UK (likely a referendum of general election). It is, however, entirely possible for such an extension to be granted.

The date on which the United Kingdom ceases to be a member state of the European Union can be extended, by a procedure described in section 3 of Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union:

  1. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend this period.

The negotiating period has already been extended twice, and lawfully can be extended again provided all EU member states agree.

We can speculate as to whether there will be a unanimous verdict to extend the period from the European Council - the current belief amongst most people is that major political changes in the UK will be required for such an extension to be granted, as it is unlikely that all EU Member states will agree to an extension without there being a clear purpose for said extension, and a path forward to break the political deadlock in the UK (likely a referendum of general election). It is, however, entirely possible for such an extension to be granted.

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source | link

The date on which the United Kingdom ceases to be a member state of the European Union can be extended, by a procedure described in section 3 of Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union:

  1. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend this period.

The negotiating period has already been extended twice, and lawfully can be extended again provided all EU member states agree.

We can speculate as to whether their will be a unanimous verdict to extend the period from the European Council - the current belief amongst most people is that major political changes in the UK will be required for such an extension to be granted, as it is unlikely that all EU Member states will agree to an extension without there being a clear purpose for said extension, and a path forward to break the political deadlock in the UK (likely a referendum of general election). It is, however, entirely possible for such an extension to be granted.