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Many Germans who have friends and family really enjoy the fact that there is one "common day off" in the week which is the same for all family members. Going to church together has become rather uncommon, but the benefit for the family remains.

Of course one cannot go shopping together on this "common day off," but that's where the golden rule comes in -- treat others as you would want them to treat you. Doctors and nurses work on Sundays. So do bakers and train conductors, television staff and gas station attendants. But as many people as possible get Sunday off.

The Soviets tried to tinker with staggered days off to run factories every day, but this caused a rather unhappy population.

There are occasional complaints of free market advocates who say that shops should be free to open any time they want, provided they can find customers and hire sales clerks. The usual answer is that the Ladenschlussgesetz is an important part of worker protection legislation and shouldn't be given up, because supermarkets and individual sales clerks are not negotiating on a level playing field. Another form of pushback are trade unions who negotiated a bonus for Sunday work. (Trade unions in Germany are stronger than in the US. I don't know about Israel in this regard.)

Many Germans who have friends and family really enjoy the fact that there is one "common day off" in the week which is the same for all family members. Going to church together has become rather uncommon, but the benefit for the family remains.

Of course one cannot go shopping together on this "common day off," but that's where the golden rule comes in -- treat others as you would want them to treat you. Doctors and nurses work on Sundays. So do bakers and train conductors, television staff and gas station attendants. But as many people as possible get Sunday off.

The Soviets tried to tinker with staggered days off to run factories every day, but this caused a rather unhappy population.

Many Germans who have friends and family really enjoy the fact that there is one "common day off" in the week which is the same for all family members. Going to church together has become rather uncommon, but the benefit for the family remains.

Of course one cannot go shopping together on this "common day off," but that's where the golden rule comes in -- treat others as you would want them to treat you. Doctors and nurses work on Sundays. So do bakers and train conductors, television staff and gas station attendants. But as many people as possible get Sunday off.

The Soviets tried to tinker with staggered days off to run factories every day, but this caused a rather unhappy population.

There are occasional complaints of free market advocates who say that shops should be free to open any time they want, provided they can find customers and hire sales clerks. The usual answer is that the Ladenschlussgesetz is an important part of worker protection legislation and shouldn't be given up, because supermarkets and individual sales clerks are not negotiating on a level playing field. Another form of pushback are trade unions who negotiated a bonus for Sunday work. (Trade unions in Germany are stronger than in the US. I don't know about Israel in this regard.)

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Many Germans who have friends and family really enjoy the fact that there is one "common day off" in the week which is the same for all family members. Going to church together has become rather uncommon, but the benefit for the family remains.

Of course one cannot go shopping together on this "common day off," but that's where the golden rule comes in -- treat others as you would want them to treat you. Doctors and nurses work on Sundays. So do bakers and train conductors, television staff and gas station attendants. But as many people as possible get Sunday off.

The Soviets tried to tinker with staggered days off to run factories every day, but this caused a rather unhappy population.