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I know you asked about Germany, but, since the purpose of your question is to ask about government-enforced holidays

as a north-american secular myself

I would encourage you to look up the history of "blue laws" in the US. The last time I checked, Bergen County of NJ (the one right outside of NYC) still makes it virtually illegal to open retail establishments on Sunday. This ends up being quite an inconvenience to the large religious Jewish community living in NYC. They can't shop on Shabbos and they can't shop in most of the NJ malls (which are in the Bergen County). So this excludes their entire weekend.

The blue laws have been litigated all the way up to SCOTUS and it's been ruled that local communities do have a right to enforce off-days rigorously for the purposes of regulating traffic loads on roads and forcing businesses to allow off days for most workers. This is completely secular reasoning.

The only religious element of it maybe in deciding on which day of the week must be the off-day fall. But this is just as likely to be based on simple majority preference rather than on any true religious conviction.

I know you asked about Germany, but, since the purpose of your question is to ask about government-enforced holidays

as a north-american secular myself

I would encourage you to look up the history of "blue laws" in the US. The last time I checked, Bergen County of NJ (the one right outside of NYC) still makes it virtually illegal to open retail establishments on Sunday. This ends up being quite an inconvenience to the large religious Jewish community living in NYC. They can't shop on Shabbos and they can't shop in most of the NJ malls (which are in the Bergen County). So this excludes their entire weekend.

The blue laws have been litigated all the way up to SCOTUS and it's been ruled that local communities do have a right to enforce off-days rigorously for the purposes of regulating traffic loads on roads and forcing businesses to allow off days for most workers. This is completely secular reasoning.

The only religious element of it maybe in deciding on which day of the week must the off-day fall. But this is just as likely to be based on simple majority preference rather than on any true religious conviction.

I know you asked about Germany, but, since the purpose of your question is to ask about government-enforced holidays

as a north-american secular myself

I would encourage you to look up the history of "blue laws" in the US. The last time I checked, Bergen County of NJ (the one right outside of NYC) still makes it virtually illegal to open retail establishments on Sunday. This ends up being quite an inconvenience to the large religious Jewish community living in NYC. They can't shop on Shabbos and they can't shop in most of the NJ malls (which are in the Bergen County). So this excludes their entire weekend.

The blue laws have been litigated all the way up to SCOTUS and it's been ruled that local communities do have a right to enforce off-days rigorously for the purposes of regulating traffic loads on roads and forcing businesses to allow off days for most workers. This is completely secular reasoning.

The only religious element of it maybe in deciding which day of the week must be the off-day. But this is just as likely to be based on simple majority preference rather than on any true religious conviction.

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source | link

I know you asked about Germany, but, since the purpose of your question is to ask about government-enforced holidays

as a north-american secular myself

I would encourage you to look up the history of "blue laws" in the US. The last time I checked, Bergen County of NJ (the one right outside of NYC) still makes it virtually illegal to open retail establishments on Sunday. This ends up being quite an inconvenience to the large religious Jewish community living in NYC. They can't shop on Shabbos and they can't shop in most of the NJ malls (which are in the Bergen County). So this excludes their entire weekend.

The blue laws have been litigated all the way up to SCOTUS and it's been ruled that local communities do have a right to enforce off-days rigorously for the purposes of regulating traffic loads on roads and forcing businesses to allow off days for most workers. This is completely secular reasoning.

The only religious element of it maybe in deciding on which day of the week must the off-day fall. But this is just as likely to be based on simple majority preference rather than on any true religious conviction.