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AnyNight work on these holidays alsohas to be compensated in some way (money or time off) according to § 6 (5) ArbZG, and german courts deem a minimum of 25 % extra pay 'angemessen' (appropriately) in the sense it is written in that paragraph (10 AZR 423/14); the same provision (though with other percentages) is true for Sundays and holidays after §11 ArbZG, additionally demanding to replace the day off on another day within a fortnight. Any work at night, Sunday and holidays can be paid extra without taxes according to the Einkommensteuergesetz (EStG) (~income tax law) §3b, whichincentivizing to give extra pay. It regulates how much of the extra pay is free of taxes: 25% for working night (20:00-06:00), which is increased to 40% for 00:00 to 04:00 if work started before midnight, and 50% for working Sunday, which is extended to the first 4 hours of the next day if work started before midnight. For 31st December past 14:00 and any holiday between 0:00 and 24:00 it's 125% (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday), and on 1st May as well as between 24th December 14:00 and 26th December 24:00 (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday) with 150%.

Any work on these holidays also is to be paid extra without taxes according to the Einkommensteuergesetz (EStG) (~income tax law) §3b, which regulates how much of the extra pay is free of taxes: 25% for working night (20:00-06:00), which is increased to 40% for 00:00 to 04:00 if work started before midnight, and 50% for working Sunday, which is extended to the first 4 hours of the next day if work started before midnight. For 31st December past 14:00 and any holiday between 0:00 and 24:00 it's 125% (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday), and on 1st May as well as between 24th December 14:00 and 26th December 24:00 (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday) with 150%.

Night work has to be compensated in some way (money or time off) according to § 6 (5) ArbZG, and german courts deem a minimum of 25 % extra pay 'angemessen' (appropriately) in the sense it is written in that paragraph (10 AZR 423/14); the same provision (though with other percentages) is true for Sundays and holidays after §11 ArbZG, additionally demanding to replace the day off on another day within a fortnight. Any work at night, Sunday and holidays can be paid extra without taxes according to the Einkommensteuergesetz (EStG) (~income tax law) §3b, incentivizing to give extra pay. It regulates how much of the extra pay is free of taxes: 25% for working night (20:00-06:00), which is increased to 40% for 00:00 to 04:00 if work started before midnight, and 50% for working Sunday, which is extended to the first 4 hours of the next day if work started before midnight. For 31st December past 14:00 and any holiday between 0:00 and 24:00 it's 125% (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday), and on 1st May as well as between 24th December 14:00 and 26th December 24:00 (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday) with 150%.

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In Germany, even without the Ladenschlussgesetz, working Sundays is constitutionally forbidden under Artikel 140 Grundgesetz (footnote 139) unless altered by law. So shops wouldn't necessarily be able to open on Sundays. Atop that there is the Arbeitszeitgesetz (ArbZG) §9 Abs. 1, which again forbids working on Sundays.

It does however provision to allow it if there is a special need to do so, such as working in a field that can't stop work Sundays (under §10 ArbZG are among others ER and hotels, if stopping production for Sundays would be undue [like shutting down a petrol plant] and for bakeries; in other provision, no workweek may have more than 6 days and may generally not exceed 4048 h in 8h days, some exceptions apply to allow 10 h as absolute maximum, no exceptions allowed). A special case of special need is if a town calls for a city-wide Shopping Sunday, which again, takes the shape of a law.

There's a special case of special need for shops that are located in Kurorten, where the Bäderverordnung regulates how often and how long a shop may have open to provide for those guests during the guest-season.

Any work on these holidays also is to be paid extra without taxes according to the Einkommensteuergesetz (EStG) (~income tax law) §3b, which regulates how much of the extra pay is free of taxes: 25% for working night (20:00-06:00), which is increased to 40% for 00:00 to 04:00 if work started before midnight, and 50% for working Sunday, which is extended to the first 4 hours of the next day if work started before midnight. For 31st December past 14:00 and any holiday between 0:00 and 24:00 it's 125% (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday), and on 1st May as well as between 24th December 14:00 and 26th December 24:00 (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday) with 150%.

Generally, those are not taken as the amount of extra pay as it is just the amount of extra pay that is tax-free. Only the employment contract and a couple of judications by the BAG do dictate that extra pay (like 25-30% Bonus night pay) and it can be quite different. For example, the German post/DHL does pay, according to this leaflet, a set bonus pay of 30% for Sunday, 35% for easter and some holidays, 135% for holidays during the workweek, 10% for Saturday 13:00-20:00 and 25% for nights.

Note that there are also laws that pretty much prohibit some jobs from working on Sundays: it is illegal to transport goods via truck on Sundays and holidays, unless one can obtain a license which is only valid for one transport and is only allowable to be given if the goods are either extremely time-sensitive or perishable. Note that if you obtain such a license and have non-licenseable goods loaded, this is punished with about 5 times the fine for violating the Sonntagsfahrverbot for trucks over 7.5 tons. This provision under Straßenverkehrsordnung §30. In an extension to this, it is also forbidden to drive such trucks on some highways on Saturdays during the holiday season to alleviate traffic.

All these laws are not about secular vs. religion, they are about worker rights and, in case of the truck-transport prohibitions, to protect the population from undue noise and keep the roads free for the general population for weekend and summer holiday season.

In Germany, even without the Ladenschlussgesetz, working Sundays is constitutionally forbidden under Artikel 140 Grundgesetz (footnote 139) unless altered by law. So shops wouldn't necessarily be able to open on Sundays. Atop that there is the Arbeitszeitgesetz (ArbZG) §9 Abs. 1, which again forbids working on Sundays.

It does however provision to allow it if there is a special need to do so, such as working in a field that can't stop work Sundays (under §10 ArbZG are among others ER and hotels, if stopping production for Sundays would be undue [like shutting down a petrol plant] and for bakeries; in other provision, no workweek may have more than 6 days and may generally not exceed 40 h). A special case of special need is if a town calls for a city-wide Shopping Sunday, which again, takes the shape of a law.

There's a special case of special need for shops that are located in Kurorten, where the Bäderverordnung regulates how often and how long a shop may have open to provide for those guests during the guest-season.

Any work on these holidays also is to be paid extra without taxes according to the Einkommensteuergesetz (EStG) (~income tax law) §3b, which regulates how much of the extra pay is free of taxes: 25% for working night (20:00-06:00), which is increased to 40% for 00:00 to 04:00 if work started before midnight, and 50% for working Sunday, which is extended to the first 4 hours of the next day if work started before midnight. For 31st December past 14:00 and any holiday between 0:00 and 24:00 it's 125% (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday), and on 1st May as well as between 24th December 14:00 and 26th December 24:00 (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday) with 150%.

Generally, those are not taken as the amount of extra pay as it is just the amount of extra pay that is tax-free. Only the employment contract and a couple of judications by the BAG do dictate that extra pay (like 25-30% Bonus night pay) and it can be quite different. For example, the German post/DHL does pay, according to this leaflet, a set bonus pay of 30% for Sunday, 35% for easter and some holidays, 135% for holidays during the workweek, 10% for Saturday 13:00-20:00 and 25% for nights.

Note that there are also laws that pretty much prohibit some jobs from working on Sundays: it is illegal to transport goods via truck on Sundays and holidays, unless one can obtain a license which is only valid for one transport and is only allowable to be given if the goods are either extremely time-sensitive or perishable. Note that if you obtain such a license and have non-licenseable goods loaded, this is punished with about 5 times the fine for violating the Sonntagsfahrverbot for trucks over 7.5 tons. This provision under Straßenverkehrsordnung §30. In an extension to this, it is also forbidden to drive such trucks on some highways on Saturdays during the holiday season to alleviate traffic.

All these laws are not about secular vs. religion, they are about worker rights and, in case of the truck-transport prohibitions, to protect the population from undue noise and keep the roads free for the general population for weekend and summer holiday season.

In Germany, even without the Ladenschlussgesetz, working Sundays is constitutionally forbidden under Artikel 140 Grundgesetz (footnote 139) unless altered by law. So shops wouldn't necessarily be able to open on Sundays. Atop that there is the Arbeitszeitgesetz (ArbZG) §9 Abs. 1, which again forbids working on Sundays.

It does however provision to allow it if there is a special need to do so, such as working in a field that can't stop work Sundays (under §10 ArbZG are among others ER and hotels, if stopping production for Sundays would be undue [like shutting down a petrol plant] and for bakeries; in other provision, no workweek may have more than 6 days and may generally not exceed 48 h in 8h days, some exceptions apply to allow 10 h as absolute maximum, no exceptions allowed). A special case of special need is if a town calls for a city-wide Shopping Sunday, which again, takes the shape of a law.

There's a special case of special need for shops that are located in Kurorten, where the Bäderverordnung regulates how often and how long a shop may have open to provide for those guests during the guest-season.

Any work on these holidays also is to be paid extra without taxes according to the Einkommensteuergesetz (EStG) (~income tax law) §3b, which regulates how much of the extra pay is free of taxes: 25% for working night (20:00-06:00), which is increased to 40% for 00:00 to 04:00 if work started before midnight, and 50% for working Sunday, which is extended to the first 4 hours of the next day if work started before midnight. For 31st December past 14:00 and any holiday between 0:00 and 24:00 it's 125% (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday), and on 1st May as well as between 24th December 14:00 and 26th December 24:00 (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday) with 150%.

Generally, those are not taken as the amount of extra pay as it is just the amount of extra pay that is tax-free. Only the employment contract and a couple of judications by the BAG do dictate that extra pay (like 25-30% Bonus night pay) and it can be quite different. For example, the German post/DHL does pay, according to this leaflet, a set bonus pay of 30% for Sunday, 35% for easter and some holidays, 135% for holidays during the workweek, 10% for Saturday 13:00-20:00 and 25% for nights.

Note that there are also laws that pretty much prohibit some jobs from working on Sundays: it is illegal to transport goods via truck on Sundays and holidays, unless one can obtain a license which is only valid for one transport and is only allowable to be given if the goods are either extremely time-sensitive or perishable. Note that if you obtain such a license and have non-licenseable goods loaded, this is punished with about 5 times the fine for violating the Sonntagsfahrverbot for trucks over 7.5 tons. This provision under Straßenverkehrsordnung §30. In an extension to this, it is also forbidden to drive such trucks on some highways on Saturdays during the holiday season to alleviate traffic.

All these laws are not about secular vs. religion, they are about worker rights and, in case of the truck-transport prohibitions, to protect the population from undue noise and keep the roads free for the general population for weekend and summer holiday season.

5 Corrected reference to the right passage in Grundgesetz
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In Germany, even without the Ladenschlussgesetz, working Sundays is constitutionally forbidden under Artikel 139140 Grundgesetz (footnote 139) unless altered by law. So shops wouldn't necessarily be able to open on Sundays. Atop that there is the Arbeitszeitgesetz (ArbZG) §9 Abs. 1, which again forbids working on Sundays.

It does however provision to allow it if there is a special need to do so, such as working in a field that can't stop work Sundays (under §10 ArbZG are among others ER and hotels, if stopping production for Sundays would be undue [like shutting down a petrol plant] and for bakeries; in other provision, no workweek may have more than 6 days and may generally not exceed 40 h). A special case of special need is if a town calls for a city-wide Shopping Sunday, which again, takes the shape of a law.

There's a special case of special need for shops that are located in Kurorten, where the Bäderverordnung regulates how often and how long a shop may have open to provide for those guests during the guest-season.

Any work on these holidays also is to be paid extra without taxes according to the Einkommensteuergesetz (EStG) (~income tax law) §3b, which regulates how much of the extra pay is free of taxes: 25% for working night (20:00-06:00), which is increased to 40% for 00:00 to 04:00 if work started before midnight, and 50% for working Sunday, which is extended to the first 4 hours of the next day if work started before midnight. For 31st December past 14:00 and any holiday between 0:00 and 24:00 it's 125% (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday), and on 1st May as well as between 24th December 14:00 and 26th December 24:00 (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday) with 150%.

Generally, those are not taken as the amount of extra pay as it is just the amount of extra pay that is tax-free. Only the employment contract and a couple of judications by the BAG do dictate that extra pay (like 25-30% Bonus night pay) and it can be quite different. For example, the German post/DHL does pay, according to this leaflet, a set bonus pay of 30% for Sunday, 35% for easter and some holidays, 135% for holidays during the workweek, 10% for Saturday 13:00-20:00 and 25% for nights.

Note that there are also laws that pretty much prohibit some jobs from working on Sundays: it is illegal to transport goods via truck on Sundays and holidays, unless one can obtain a license which is only valid for one transport and is only allowable to be given if the goods are either extremely time-sensitive or perishable. Note that if you obtain such a license and have non-licenseable goods loaded, this is punished with about 5 times the fine for violating the Sonntagsfahrverbot for trucks over 7.5 tons. This provision under Straßenverkehrsordnung §30. In an extension to this, it is also forbidden to drive such trucks on some highways on Saturdays during the holiday season to alleviate traffic.

All these laws are not about secular vs. religion, they are about worker rights and, in case of the truck-transport prohibitions, to protect the population from undue noise and keep the roads free for the general population for weekend and summer holiday season.

In Germany, even without the Ladenschlussgesetz, working Sundays is constitutionally forbidden under Artikel 139 Grundgesetz unless altered by law. So shops wouldn't necessarily be able to open on Sundays. Atop that there is the Arbeitszeitgesetz (ArbZG) §9 Abs. 1, which again forbids working on Sundays.

It does however provision to allow it if there is a special need to do so, such as working in a field that can't stop work Sundays (under §10 ArbZG are among others ER and hotels, if stopping production for Sundays would be undue [like shutting down a petrol plant] and for bakeries; in other provision, no workweek may have more than 6 days and may generally not exceed 40 h). A special case of special need is if a town calls for a city-wide Shopping Sunday, which again, takes the shape of a law.

There's a special case of special need for shops that are located in Kurorten, where the Bäderverordnung regulates how often and how long a shop may have open to provide for those guests during the guest-season.

Any work on these holidays also is to be paid extra without taxes according to the Einkommensteuergesetz (EStG) (~income tax law) §3b, which regulates how much of the extra pay is free of taxes: 25% for working night (20:00-06:00), which is increased to 40% for 00:00 to 04:00 if work started before midnight, and 50% for working Sunday, which is extended to the first 4 hours of the next day if work started before midnight. For 31st December past 14:00 and any holiday between 0:00 and 24:00 it's 125% (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday), and on 1st May as well as between 24th December 14:00 and 26th December 24:00 (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday) with 150%.

Generally, those are not taken as the amount of extra pay as it is just the amount of extra pay that is tax-free. Only the employment contract and a couple of judications by the BAG do dictate that extra pay (like 25-30% Bonus night pay) and it can be quite different. For example, the German post/DHL does pay, according to this leaflet, a set bonus pay of 30% for Sunday, 35% for easter and some holidays, 135% for holidays during the workweek, 10% for Saturday 13:00-20:00 and 25% for nights.

Note that there are also laws that pretty much prohibit some jobs from working on Sundays: it is illegal to transport goods via truck on Sundays and holidays, unless one can obtain a license which is only valid for one transport and is only allowable to be given if the goods are either extremely time-sensitive or perishable. Note that if you obtain such a license and have non-licenseable goods loaded, this is punished with about 5 times the fine for violating the Sonntagsfahrverbot for trucks over 7.5 tons. This provision under Straßenverkehrsordnung §30. In an extension to this, it is also forbidden to drive such trucks on some highways on Saturdays during the holiday season to alleviate traffic.

All these laws are not about secular vs. religion, they are about worker rights and, in case of the truck-transport prohibitions, to protect the population from undue noise and keep the roads free for the general population for weekend and summer holiday season.

In Germany, even without the Ladenschlussgesetz, working Sundays is constitutionally forbidden under Artikel 140 Grundgesetz (footnote 139) unless altered by law. So shops wouldn't necessarily be able to open on Sundays. Atop that there is the Arbeitszeitgesetz (ArbZG) §9 Abs. 1, which again forbids working on Sundays.

It does however provision to allow it if there is a special need to do so, such as working in a field that can't stop work Sundays (under §10 ArbZG are among others ER and hotels, if stopping production for Sundays would be undue [like shutting down a petrol plant] and for bakeries; in other provision, no workweek may have more than 6 days and may generally not exceed 40 h). A special case of special need is if a town calls for a city-wide Shopping Sunday, which again, takes the shape of a law.

There's a special case of special need for shops that are located in Kurorten, where the Bäderverordnung regulates how often and how long a shop may have open to provide for those guests during the guest-season.

Any work on these holidays also is to be paid extra without taxes according to the Einkommensteuergesetz (EStG) (~income tax law) §3b, which regulates how much of the extra pay is free of taxes: 25% for working night (20:00-06:00), which is increased to 40% for 00:00 to 04:00 if work started before midnight, and 50% for working Sunday, which is extended to the first 4 hours of the next day if work started before midnight. For 31st December past 14:00 and any holiday between 0:00 and 24:00 it's 125% (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday), and on 1st May as well as between 24th December 14:00 and 26th December 24:00 (with the 4-hour extension like on a Sunday) with 150%.

Generally, those are not taken as the amount of extra pay as it is just the amount of extra pay that is tax-free. Only the employment contract and a couple of judications by the BAG do dictate that extra pay (like 25-30% Bonus night pay) and it can be quite different. For example, the German post/DHL does pay, according to this leaflet, a set bonus pay of 30% for Sunday, 35% for easter and some holidays, 135% for holidays during the workweek, 10% for Saturday 13:00-20:00 and 25% for nights.

Note that there are also laws that pretty much prohibit some jobs from working on Sundays: it is illegal to transport goods via truck on Sundays and holidays, unless one can obtain a license which is only valid for one transport and is only allowable to be given if the goods are either extremely time-sensitive or perishable. Note that if you obtain such a license and have non-licenseable goods loaded, this is punished with about 5 times the fine for violating the Sonntagsfahrverbot for trucks over 7.5 tons. This provision under Straßenverkehrsordnung §30. In an extension to this, it is also forbidden to drive such trucks on some highways on Saturdays during the holiday season to alleviate traffic.

All these laws are not about secular vs. religion, they are about worker rights and, in case of the truck-transport prohibitions, to protect the population from undue noise and keep the roads free for the general population for weekend and summer holiday season.

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