2 IP is a protocol; it is IP addresses that are static, blocked, assigned, bound, fetched, accessed, resolved, checked, banned, tracked, detected, dynamic, grabbed, scanned, whitelisted, have different representations, that devices have, etc., not the protocol itself.
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IANA isn't responsible for allocating IP address ranges to countries. Instead, it delegates allocations to one of the five regional Internet registries. In the case of North Korea, the RIR responsible would be APNIC. Theoretically, the US could mess with APNIC's IP address blocks, but at the risk of angering quite a few people (including - but not limited to - the Chinese, Australians and Indians).

Furthermore we know that at least one of the two currently known North Korean IP address ranges1 is owned by a Chinese entity: China Netcom. Even if the US could somehow deny North Korea their IP address ranges, there'd be very little stopping them from using Chinese ones.  

1 175.45.176.0 – 175.45.179.255 & 210.52.109.0 – 210.52.109.255

IANA isn't responsible for allocating IP ranges to countries. Instead, it delegates allocations to one of the five regional Internet registries. In the case of North Korea, the RIR responsible would be APNIC. Theoretically, the US could mess with APNIC's IP blocks, but at the risk of angering quite a few people (including - but not limited to - the Chinese, Australians and Indians).

Furthermore we know that at least one of the two currently known North Korean IP ranges1 is owned by a Chinese entity: China Netcom. Even if the US could somehow deny North Korea their IP ranges, there'd be very little stopping them from using Chinese ones.  

1 175.45.176.0 – 175.45.179.255 & 210.52.109.0 – 210.52.109.255

IANA isn't responsible for allocating IP address ranges to countries. Instead, it delegates allocations to one of the five regional Internet registries. In the case of North Korea, the RIR responsible would be APNIC. Theoretically, the US could mess with APNIC's IP address blocks, but at the risk of angering quite a few people (including - but not limited to - the Chinese, Australians and Indians).

Furthermore we know that at least one of the two currently known North Korean IP address ranges1 is owned by a Chinese entity: China Netcom. Even if the US could somehow deny North Korea their IP address ranges, there'd be very little stopping them from using Chinese ones.

1 175.45.176.0 – 175.45.179.255 & 210.52.109.0 – 210.52.109.255

1
source | link

IANA isn't responsible for allocating IP ranges to countries. Instead, it delegates allocations to one of the five regional Internet registries. In the case of North Korea, the RIR responsible would be APNIC. Theoretically, the US could mess with APNIC's IP blocks, but at the risk of angering quite a few people (including - but not limited to - the Chinese, Australians and Indians).

Furthermore we know that at least one of the two currently known North Korean IP ranges1 is owned by a Chinese entity: China Netcom. Even if the US could somehow deny North Korea their IP ranges, there'd be very little stopping them from using Chinese ones.

1 175.45.176.0 – 175.45.179.255 & 210.52.109.0 – 210.52.109.255