I converted from lists to the fancy new tables.
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Bobson
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tl;dr: There are currently 13 senate seats which could be flipped (plus one special case), 7 would go to the Republicans and 6 to the Democrats

Not including those states where an interim gubernatorial appointment is permitted but limited to 6 months or less (which accounts for four states where the governor and at least one senator are not from the same party), currently 5 states' governors have the ability and party preference to swing the senate to the Republicans, and 4 where there would be a swing to the Democrats.

To the Republicans:

  • Brian Kemp, Georgia; Both Jon Ossoff & Raphael Warnock
  • Greg Gianforte, Montana; Jon Tester
  • Chris Sununu, New Hampshire; Both Jeanne Shaheen & Maggie Hassan
  • Richard Michael DeWine, Ohio; Sherrod Brown
  • Jim Justice, West Virginia; Joe Manchin
GovernorStateSenators
Brian KempGeorgiaBoth Jon Ossoff & Raphael Warnock
Greg GianforteMontanaJon Tester
Chris SununuNew HampshireBoth Jeanne Shaheen & Maggie Hassan
Richard Michael DeWineOhioSherrod Brown
Jim JusticeWest VirginiaJoe Manchin

To the Democrats

  • Laura Kelly, Kansas; Both Jerry Moran & Roger Marshall
  • Andy Beshear, Kentucky; Both Mitch McConnell & Rand Paul
  • Janet T. Mills, Maine; Susan Collins (and technically, Angus King)
  • Tom Wolf, Pennsylvania; Pat Toomey
GovernorStateSenators
Laura KellyKansasBoth Jerry Moran & Roger Marshall
Andy BeshearKentuckyBoth Mitch McConnell & Rand Paul
Janet T. MillsMaineSusan Collins (and technically, Angus King)
Tom WolfPennsylvaniaPat Toomey

A note on Angus King, although an Independent, he does caucus with the Democratic party.

Arizona, Maryland, and North Carolina would fall under this, but the law states that replacement senators appointed by the governor must be of the same party as the senator who vacated the seat.

There are three states which would see interim gubernatorial appointments, where at least one senator from that state is currently not of the same party as the governor.

  • Louisiana - max 11 weeks; Bill Cassidy & John Kennedy
  • Massachusetts - max 160 days; Elizabeth Warren & Ed Markey
  • Vermont - max 6 months; Patrick Leahy & Bernie Sanders
StateLengthSenators
Louisianamax 11 weeksBill Cassidy & John Kennedy
Massachusettsmax 160 daysElizabeth Warren & Ed Markey
Vermontmax 6 monthsPatrick Leahy & Bernie Sanders

The only state where there is a disparity between one or both senators and the governor where the governor can not appoint, even temporarily, a replacement senator would be Wisconsin (Ron Johnson).

Sources: Ballotpedia & Wikipedia

tl;dr: There are currently 13 senate seats which could be flipped (plus one special case), 7 would go to the Republicans and 6 to the Democrats

Not including those states where an interim gubernatorial appointment is permitted but limited to 6 months or less (which accounts for four states where the governor and at least one senator are not from the same party), currently 5 states' governors have the ability and party preference to swing the senate to the Republicans, and 4 where there would be a swing to the Democrats.

To the Republicans:

  • Brian Kemp, Georgia; Both Jon Ossoff & Raphael Warnock
  • Greg Gianforte, Montana; Jon Tester
  • Chris Sununu, New Hampshire; Both Jeanne Shaheen & Maggie Hassan
  • Richard Michael DeWine, Ohio; Sherrod Brown
  • Jim Justice, West Virginia; Joe Manchin

To the Democrats

  • Laura Kelly, Kansas; Both Jerry Moran & Roger Marshall
  • Andy Beshear, Kentucky; Both Mitch McConnell & Rand Paul
  • Janet T. Mills, Maine; Susan Collins (and technically, Angus King)
  • Tom Wolf, Pennsylvania; Pat Toomey

A note on Angus King, although an Independent, he does caucus with the Democratic party.

Arizona, Maryland, and North Carolina would fall under this, but the law states that replacement senators appointed by the governor must be of the same party as the senator who vacated the seat.

There are three states which would see interim gubernatorial appointments, where at least one senator from that state is currently not of the same party as the governor.

  • Louisiana - max 11 weeks; Bill Cassidy & John Kennedy
  • Massachusetts - max 160 days; Elizabeth Warren & Ed Markey
  • Vermont - max 6 months; Patrick Leahy & Bernie Sanders

The only state where there is a disparity between one or both senators and the governor where the governor can not appoint, even temporarily, a replacement senator would be Wisconsin (Ron Johnson).

Sources: Ballotpedia & Wikipedia

tl;dr: There are currently 13 senate seats which could be flipped (plus one special case), 7 would go to the Republicans and 6 to the Democrats

Not including those states where an interim gubernatorial appointment is permitted but limited to 6 months or less (which accounts for four states where the governor and at least one senator are not from the same party), currently 5 states' governors have the ability and party preference to swing the senate to the Republicans, and 4 where there would be a swing to the Democrats.

To the Republicans:

GovernorStateSenators
Brian KempGeorgiaBoth Jon Ossoff & Raphael Warnock
Greg GianforteMontanaJon Tester
Chris SununuNew HampshireBoth Jeanne Shaheen & Maggie Hassan
Richard Michael DeWineOhioSherrod Brown
Jim JusticeWest VirginiaJoe Manchin

To the Democrats

GovernorStateSenators
Laura KellyKansasBoth Jerry Moran & Roger Marshall
Andy BeshearKentuckyBoth Mitch McConnell & Rand Paul
Janet T. MillsMaineSusan Collins (and technically, Angus King)
Tom WolfPennsylvaniaPat Toomey

A note on Angus King, although an Independent, he does caucus with the Democratic party.

Arizona, Maryland, and North Carolina would fall under this, but the law states that replacement senators appointed by the governor must be of the same party as the senator who vacated the seat.

There are three states which would see interim gubernatorial appointments, where at least one senator from that state is currently not of the same party as the governor.

StateLengthSenators
Louisianamax 11 weeksBill Cassidy & John Kennedy
Massachusettsmax 160 daysElizabeth Warren & Ed Markey
Vermontmax 6 monthsPatrick Leahy & Bernie Sanders

The only state where there is a disparity between one or both senators and the governor where the governor can not appoint, even temporarily, a replacement senator would be Wisconsin (Ron Johnson).

Sources: Ballotpedia & Wikipedia

Edited to add the names of the governors, so as to actually answer the question in the title.
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GeoffAtkins
  • 1.7k
  • 1
  • 13
  • 19

tl;dr: There are currently 13 senate seats which could be flipped (plus one special case), 7 would go to the Republicans and 6 to the Democrats

Not including those states where an interim gubernatorial appointment is permitted but limited to 6 months or less (which accounts for four states where the governor and at least one senator are not from the same party), currently 5 states' governors have the ability and party preference to swing the senate to the Republicans, and 4 where there would be a swing to the Democrats.

To the Republicans:

  • Brian Kemp, Georgia; Both Jon Ossoff & Raphael Warnock
  • Greg Gianforte, Montana; Jon Tester
  • Chris Sununu, New Hampshire; Both Jeanne Shaheen & Maggie Hassan
  • Richard Michael DeWine, Ohio; Sherrod Brown
  • Jim Justice, West Virginia; Joe Manchin

To the Democrats

  • Laura Kelly, Kansas; Both Jerry Moran & RogerRoger Marshall
  • Andy Beshear, Kentucky; Both Mitch McConnell & Rand Paul
  • Janet T. Mills, Maine; Susan Collins (and technically, Angus King)
  • Tom Wolf, Pennsylvania; Pat Toomey

A note on Angus King, although an Independent, he does caucus with the Democratic party.

Arizona, Maryland, and North Carolina would fall under this, but the law states that replacement senators appointed by the governor must be of the same party as the senator who vacated the seat.

There are three states which would see interim gubernatorial appointments, where at least one senator from that state is currently not of the same party as the governor.

  • Louisiana - max 11 weeks; Bill Cassidy & John Kennedy
  • Massachusetts - max 160 days; Elizabeth Warren & Ed Markey
  • Vermont - max 6 months; Patrick Leahy & Bernie Sanders

The only state where there is a disparity between one or both senators and the governor where the governor can not appoint, even temporarily, a replacement senator would be Wisconsin (Ron Johnson).

Sources: Ballotpedia & Wikipedia

tl;dr: There are currently 13 senate seats which could be flipped (plus one special case), 7 would go to the Republicans and 6 to the Democrats

Not including those states where an interim gubernatorial appointment is permitted but limited to 6 months or less (which accounts for four states where the governor and at least one senator are not from the same party), currently 5 states' governors have the ability and party preference to swing the senate to the Republicans, and 4 where there would be a swing to the Democrats.

To the Republicans:

  • Georgia; Both Jon Ossoff & Raphael Warnock
  • Montana; Jon Tester
  • New Hampshire; Both Jeanne Shaheen & Maggie Hassan
  • Ohio; Sherrod Brown
  • West Virginia; Joe Manchin

To the Democrats

  • Kansas; Both Jerry Moran & Roger Marshall
  • Kentucky; Both Mitch McConnell & Rand Paul
  • Maine; Susan Collins (and technically, Angus King)
  • Pennsylvania; Pat Toomey

A note on Angus King, although an Independent, he does caucus with the Democratic party.

Arizona, Maryland, and North Carolina would fall under this, but the law states that replacement senators appointed by the governor must be of the same party as the senator who vacated the seat.

There are three states which would see interim gubernatorial appointments, where at least one senator from that state is currently not of the same party as the governor.

  • Louisiana - max 11 weeks; Bill Cassidy & John Kennedy
  • Massachusetts - max 160 days; Elizabeth Warren & Ed Markey
  • Vermont - max 6 months; Patrick Leahy & Bernie Sanders

The only state where there is a disparity between one or both senators and the governor where the governor can not appoint, even temporarily, a replacement senator would be Wisconsin (Ron Johnson).

Sources: Ballotpedia & Wikipedia

tl;dr: There are currently 13 senate seats which could be flipped (plus one special case), 7 would go to the Republicans and 6 to the Democrats

Not including those states where an interim gubernatorial appointment is permitted but limited to 6 months or less (which accounts for four states where the governor and at least one senator are not from the same party), currently 5 states' governors have the ability and party preference to swing the senate to the Republicans, and 4 where there would be a swing to the Democrats.

To the Republicans:

  • Brian Kemp, Georgia; Both Jon Ossoff & Raphael Warnock
  • Greg Gianforte, Montana; Jon Tester
  • Chris Sununu, New Hampshire; Both Jeanne Shaheen & Maggie Hassan
  • Richard Michael DeWine, Ohio; Sherrod Brown
  • Jim Justice, West Virginia; Joe Manchin

To the Democrats

  • Laura Kelly, Kansas; Both Jerry Moran & Roger Marshall
  • Andy Beshear, Kentucky; Both Mitch McConnell & Rand Paul
  • Janet T. Mills, Maine; Susan Collins (and technically, Angus King)
  • Tom Wolf, Pennsylvania; Pat Toomey

A note on Angus King, although an Independent, he does caucus with the Democratic party.

Arizona, Maryland, and North Carolina would fall under this, but the law states that replacement senators appointed by the governor must be of the same party as the senator who vacated the seat.

There are three states which would see interim gubernatorial appointments, where at least one senator from that state is currently not of the same party as the governor.

  • Louisiana - max 11 weeks; Bill Cassidy & John Kennedy
  • Massachusetts - max 160 days; Elizabeth Warren & Ed Markey
  • Vermont - max 6 months; Patrick Leahy & Bernie Sanders

The only state where there is a disparity between one or both senators and the governor where the governor can not appoint, even temporarily, a replacement senator would be Wisconsin (Ron Johnson).

Sources: Ballotpedia & Wikipedia

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GeoffAtkins
  • 1.7k
  • 1
  • 13
  • 19

tl;dr: There are currently 13 senate seats which could be flipped (plus one special case), 7 would go to the Republicans and 6 to the Democrats

Not including those states where an interim gubernatorial appointment is permitted but limited to 6 months or less (which accounts for four states where the governor and at least one senator are not from the same party), currently 5 states' governors have the ability and party preference to swing the senate to the Republicans, and 4 where there would be a swing to the Democrats.

To the Republicans:

  • Georgia; Both Jon Ossoff & Raphael Warnock
  • Montana; Jon Tester
  • New Hampshire; Both Jeanne Shaheen & Maggie Hassan
  • Ohio; Sherrod Brown
  • West Virginia; Joe Manchin

To the Democrats

  • Kansas; Both Jerry Moran & Roger Marshall
  • Kentucky; Both Mitch McConnell & Rand Paul
  • Maine; Susan Collins (and technically, Angus King)
  • Pennsylvania; Pat Toomey

A note on Angus King, although an Independent, he does caucus with the Democratic party.

Arizona, Maryland, and North Carolina would fall under this, but the law states that replacement senators appointed by the governor must be of the same party as the senator who vacated the seat.

There are three states which would see interim gubernatorial appointments, where at least one senator from that state is currently not of the same party as the governor.

  • Louisiana - max 11 weeks; Bill Cassidy & John Kennedy
  • Massachusetts - max 160 days; Elizabeth Warren & Ed Markey
  • Vermont - max 6 months; Patrick Leahy & Bernie Sanders

The only state where there is a disparity between one or both senators and the governor where the governor can not appoint, even temporarily, a replacement senator would be Wisconsin (Ron Johnson).

Sources: Ballotpedia & Wikipedia