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There are resolutions against Iran missile program. Are these resolutions legal? Or is an article specifically preventing Iran? Doesn't any country have the right to develop their own defense system?

  • You keep using the word "defense" about ballistic missiles. I do not think it means what you think it means – user4012 Apr 9 '16 at 19:09
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    One should think that any country has the right to defend itself , so nothing is wrong with Irans Missile program. I cannot remember that Iran acted aggressively against any other country since the Islamic revolution. Iran did not invade any other country or bomb the infrastructure of any other country to pieces, or kill thousands of civilians, shell schools and hospitals to the ground like some other countries did and do, to whom we in the West happily sell our sophisticated weapons. Nothing seems wrong with this. – Noor Apr 10 '16 at 21:23
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    The resolutions are just another means to try to sanction Iran's economy, restrain technical, scientific development and give the people a hard time. – Noor Apr 10 '16 at 21:37
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    @user1 Of course the fact that Iran is saying that it will use these missiles to destroy those it defines as "enemies" (anyone who object to Iran's supporting terrorism around the world) triggers the resolutions. Since they are basically opinions being expressed, then they are legal anywhere "freedom of speech" is regarded as a right. – sabbahillel Apr 11 '16 at 16:03
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    @user1 They are already trying to destroy the US and Israel because those two insist on actually trying to defend themselves against terrorism. – sabbahillel Apr 11 '16 at 16:49
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International politics are not governed by laws, so no action by a state can be definitely legal or illegal. It's in the subjective opinion of each government which actions by other governments they condone or support. International politics is basically anarchy. No country is bound to any rules they didn't agree to. You can claim that when a country breaks an agreement they signed they are breaking common law tradition, but I am not aware of any international agreements which guarantee Iran the right to own weapons of mass destruction.

When you look at the list of UN resolution concerning Iran, then these resolutions are "legal" simply because they went through the normal UN processes and weren't vetoed by any of the veto-powers. Still, they are only effective as long as all the UN members enforce them.

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