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In other words can a vice-president serve as vice-president for 3 or more terms?

Just wondering if Joe Biden could be Hillary Clinton's running mate

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The Vice-President is not term limited as Vice-president. The term limitation comes from the 22nd Amendment, which says nothing of the Vice-President. It reads, in whole:

AMENDMENT XXII

Section 1. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once. But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the office of President when this Article was proposed by the Congress, and shall not prevent any person who may be holding the office of President, or acting as President, during the term within which this Article becomes operative from holding the office of President or acting as President during the remainder of such term.

Section 2. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission to the States by the Congress.

This opens the interesting possibility that you could have someone as vice-president continuously over time. Obviously, that has never happened.

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    Just based on this, it sounds like if you had already been president for two full terms you could still run as vice president, and then if something happened to the President you'd be back in! It just says you can't be elected as president again. Quite a loophole. – Matt May 5 '16 at 21:45
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    @Matt, twelfth amendment: "But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States." – Mark May 5 '16 at 22:26
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    There's no limit to how many years someone could serve as acting President if one were elected VP, took over for an incapacitated President, ran again as VP and was elected that office, again assumed the role of acting preisdent, etc. without ever being elected President. – supercat May 5 '16 at 23:02
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    @supercat well, you would look very suspicious after a while. – tox123 May 6 '16 at 1:01
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    We refer you again to the 12th amendment: "But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States." Once people have been President for six or more years, they are no longer eligible to be Vice-President. So they could no longer get elected as Vice-President. Nor assume the office of President through the line of succession. One could argue that the 22nd amendment only bars election, but in concert with the 12th, the most sensible reading is that it bars elevation in general. – Brythan May 6 '16 at 5:11

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