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Given that leave is confirmed to have won the EU referendum, what happens now?

Will David Cameron resign? If so does that mean we will have a new PM negotiating the UK's exit deal?

And how long is the process of exiting the EU likely to take?

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    It will take 2 years max, it is written in the article 50 of the European Constitution. Everything else can't be answered, it depends of what UK people do. – Gautier C Jun 24 '16 at 7:30
  • @GautierC - You mean 2 years minimum. – GeoffAtkins Jun 24 '16 at 7:36
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    @KentaroTomono - Excuse me, but 48% of us voted to stay in (well... there was only a 72% turn out, so just over a third voted out, a third voted in, and a third didn't bother to turn up). And yes, I agree with you on the Scottish independence thing. I am frankly planning a move north of the border. – GeoffAtkins Jun 24 '16 at 7:37
  • @GeoffAtkins nop, maximum. The UK is still bound to the EU for maximum 2 years if they can't find any agreement. – Gautier C Jun 24 '16 at 7:39
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    Important point: The UK hasn't actually left the EU, the referendum (just about) voted to leave, whether/when we leave is a different matter. – mattumotu Jun 27 '16 at 10:38
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Nobody knows. Much of what is going to / might / will happen is purely speculative, as none of it has happened before (Greenland left, but that was as an autonomous region of Denmark, not the third largest economy in the EU).

However, David Cameron has announced he will step down as Prime Minister in October. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-36615028

In the European rights, UK has 2 years to leave the EU, but he would be able to leave earlier if an agreement is found.

Concerning the intention of leaving from the UK, it may be giving during the discussions around the UK referendum in the European Council the 28th and 29th of June.

But apparently Mr Cameron doesn't want to be the leader of the Brexit.

I think it's right that this new prime minister takes the decision about when to trigger article 50 and start the formal and legal process of leaving the EU

Update: 26th June The BBC released this chart outlining the process for the UK leaving. Src. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-36632579

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    Note that the 2 years is measured from when the UK announces to the European Council that it wishes to withdraw, and there isn't yet a timetable for that. – origimbo Jun 24 '16 at 8:02
  • @origimbo true, but it should be the 28th or 29th of June, during the European Council. – Gautier C Jun 24 '16 at 8:07
  • @Gautier C Do you have a reference for that? Nothing I could find made it obvious that anyone actually in power had given any firm commitment on that front, and gave estimates ranging from two weeks to months, – origimbo Jun 24 '16 at 8:11
  • @origimbo The agenda of the European Council the 28th includes the UK referendum. – Gautier C Jun 24 '16 at 8:13
  • @origimbo I have edited the answer to add this information. – Gautier C Jun 24 '16 at 8:14

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