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Hugo Chavez claimed that his government was "Bolivarian"

Wiki sayeth:

The “Bolivarian Revolution” refers to a leftist social movement and political process in Venezuela led by Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez, the founder of the Fifth Republic Movement (replaced by the United Socialist Party of Venezuela in 2007). The "Bolivarian Revolution" is named after Simón Bolívar, an early 19th century Venezuelan and Latin American revolutionary leader, prominent in the Spanish American wars of independence in achieving the independence of most of northern Latin America from Spanish rule.

Is that claim of Chavez's government/revolution being "Bolivarian" true?

E.g. are the specific policies and ideas and government details of Chavez's government similar in any/many/all/no ways to Bolivar's?

migrated from skeptics.stackexchange.com Mar 10 '13 at 9:46

This question came from our site for scientific skepticism.

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    Should this be on Politics? – Sklivvz Mar 8 '13 at 20:41
  • @Sklivvz - I'm uncertain... I'd like a more rigorous skeptics style fact-backed-up answer to this (since the question stemmed from a question asked on politics recently in the first place). Preferably backed up by some poly sci or economics research. – user4012 Mar 8 '13 at 20:48
  • You're not going to get a definite provable scientific answer to whether some political movement is similar to some other movement. Much better off on Politics. – DJClayworth Mar 9 '13 at 16:51
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A Bolivarian revolution would have to bring a bolivarian system of government.

Simón Bolivar himself said:

The most perfect system of government is the one that produces the greatest possible happiness, the greatest degree of social safety, and the greatest political stability.

Simón Bolívar: Essay written for the Angostura Congress, 1819

So, it seems that History will one day have its say, maybe in a couple of decades or more, about whether the revolution started by Hugo Chavez, was a bolivarian revolution, or not.

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    Your reference to happiness is the "Happy Planet Index", which tries to weight in eco-friendly, low environment impact countries. I do not think Bolivar was thinking about that kind of "happiness". And this is a bit strange that a state whose main ressource is petroleum is well ranked for ecology by the way. – Frédéric May 23 '17 at 18:36

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