4

Is there anything that doesn't allow the people of DPRK to cross the North Korea-Russian border?

  • What does DPRK stands for? – Bregalad Oct 15 '16 at 16:24
  • 2
    @Bregalad This is an official abbreviation for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. – Matt Oct 15 '16 at 18:09
  • 1
    Why do you want to know? Can you tell us what you know and you don't? Do you understand the internal politics of North Korea? – Rathony Oct 15 '16 at 19:03
  • @Rathony Oh, not really, that's what I'm most interested in: How do they make people stay in the country. – Probably Oct 16 '16 at 14:33
  • 1
    They can cross the border but why? Russia does not accept illegal immigrants, and it is usual practice, the only exceptions in the world where immigrants were welcome are possibly East-West Germany border and South-North Korea border. – Anixx Oct 17 '16 at 4:59
7

The border line between Russia and DPRK is very short and goes by the fairway of river Tumannaya (Tumangan). There's only one bridge with a railroad. No passengers, only goods trains.

enter image description here

On the Russian side there are a lake, a village and a border post named Khasan. By the way, in 1938 that place was an area of conflict between the Soviet Union and Japan, see Battle of Lake Khasan.

This is a short Russian TV material about Khasan border post. The soldiers say that the Koreans trespass the border quite often, because they practice illegal fishing and such. But they see it rather like a routine work.

UPD. As @gerrit noted, in the last couple of years the situation with passenger trains was changed. So now we have a passenger train Moscow-Pyongyang.

  • 3
    Just because there is only one bridge over there doesn't mean there are no other ways North Koreans will cross the border. The only reason North Koreans don't cross the border to Russia is they are less likely to succeed than crossing the border to China in terms of seeking asylum and eventually going to S. Korea. – Rathony Oct 15 '16 at 19:21
  • @Rathony One bridge means there's no legal way to get from DPRK to Russia directly (or vice versa). The short border means that in practice you can only get to Khasan village, as all other settlements are quite far from the border. – Matt Oct 15 '16 at 19:28
  • 1
    @Bregalad Or to use a boat in summer, yes. But what next? To go 100 km by foot? It's always easier to cross the border than not to get caught afterwards. – Matt Oct 15 '16 at 20:28
  • 2
    There are passenger trains. – gerrit Oct 17 '16 at 10:18
  • 1
    @gerrit Oh, thanks. So they did it. I totally missed that point. – Matt Oct 17 '16 at 10:52
0

They can cross the border but why? Russia does not accept illegal immigrants, and it is usual practice in the world, the only exceptions in the world where immigrants were welcome are possibly East-West Germany border and South-North Korea border.

Besides, why even they would want to make it to Russia? The Russian areas in the Far East are underdeveloped, and have poor infrastructure, they would not find good job etc. There is no reason to move to Russia.

  • The Russian areas in the Far East are underdeveloped, and have poor infrastructure, they would not find good job etc. Underdeveloped infrastructure is not a problem for low-qualified workers. Actually they do work in Russian Far East, but they do it legally (yes, DPRK makes money by "exporting" migrant workers). – Matt Oct 17 '16 at 6:24
  • Russia does not accept illegal immigrants, and it is usual practice in the world Well, neither China do it officially, but in practice the Koreans used to get there somehow in large numbers. Though that situation (in China) is allegedly about to change in the last time. Partially due to more strict border control, partially due to legalizing migrant workers. – Matt Oct 17 '16 at 6:30

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .