1

In a US presidential election, voters in fact select electors who later vote to select the president. I have heard that in different states, slates of electors are nominated variously by state party conventions, state party committees, or by the presidential campaigns themselves. Concretely, though, how does this work in each state?

2

The National Archives and Records Administration does describe how it generally work.

The first part of the process is controlled by the political parties in each state and varies from state to state. Generally, the parties either nominate slates of potential Electors at their state party conventions or they chose them by a vote of the party's central committee. This happens in each state for each party by whatever rules the state party and (sometimes) the national party have for the process. This first part of the process results in each Presidential candidate having their own unique slate of potential Electors.

Political parties often choose Electors for the slate to recognize their service and dedication to that political party. They may be state elected officials, state party leaders, or people in the state who have a personal or political affiliation with their party's Presidential candidate. (For specific information about how slates of potential Electors are chosen, contact the political parties in each state.)

  • "For specific information about how slates of potential Electors are chosen, contact the political parties in each state." Welp. Amazing that this info is not easily available online. – Colin Nov 28 '16 at 11:25
  • 1
    @ColinZwanziger - It's not amazing at all. Other parts of the election are formal: they are the job of government enshrined in law. Choosing of electors is informal; it is handled entirely by private individuals and political parties. – indigochild Nov 28 '16 at 17:21

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .