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Having a hard time with the googfu because 'trump' and 'electoral college' are very hot search terms right now..

I've been looking for any evidence of Trump's stance on the electoral college and whether it should be supported or abolished.

Of course it would be interesting to know if he commented both before and after the election results.

Thanks!

  • I recall reading an article recently where it stated Trump favors the popular vote more. If I find the article I'll link it. – NuWin Dec 10 '16 at 0:59
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Donald Trump used to be against the Electoral College in 2012, but it seems like he has recently changed his opinion.

On November 7th 2012 (after Barack Obama's reelection), Donald Trump tweeted:

The electoral college is a disaster for a democracy.

But on November 15th 2016 (after his election) he tweeted:

The Electoral College is actually genius in that it brings all states, including the smaller ones, into play. Campaigning is much different!

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    It should be noted that Barack Obama won both the popular vote and the electoral college vote in 2012, which brings into question why Trump was tweeting to begin with. – jalynn2 Dec 9 '16 at 18:28
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    Weird; I wonder why he changed his mind... – endolith Dec 9 '16 at 21:26
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    note that he had some later interview with NY Times I think in which he said he thought popular vote would be better, but that he would have won the popular vote too, if we had it. – endolith Dec 9 '16 at 21:26
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    And then he later claimed that he did in fact win the popular vote by millions. – rougon Dec 10 '16 at 3:29
  • He could be talking about two different things. In the first case, he may be talking about indirect representation. In the second case, he may be talking about the way the States are weighed. The term "electoral college" is frequently used to refer to either of these things. It's especially confusing when people talk about eliminating the electoral college (as Trump presumably was in the first tweet) because it's not clear what they want to get rid of: indirect voting, unequal weighing, or both. – David Schwartz Mar 10 '17 at 19:05
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OK nevermind looks like I should have added the word 'stance' in there. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker/wp/2016/11/15/trumps-flip-flop-on-the-electoral-college-from-disaster-to-genius/

Edit:

Some notable Trump tweets from the article:

Interestingly, Trump has deleted a number of tweets he sent in 2012, including:

“He [Obama] lost the popular vote by a lot and won the election. We should have a revolution in this country!” (Nov. 6)

“The phoney [sic] electoral college made a laughing stock out of our nation. The loser one!” (Nov. 6)

“More votes equals a loss…revolution!” (Nov. 7)

Yet on Tuesday, Trump tweeted:

The Electoral College is actually genius in that it brings all states, including the smaller ones, into play. Campaigning is much different!

If the election were based on total popular vote I would have campaigned in N.Y. Florida and California and won even bigger and more easily

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    Self-answers are fine, but you should including the relevant information from the link in the answer itself. Links tend to break over time. – Alexander O'Mara Dec 9 '16 at 6:43
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    Also, you can't even read the content from that link without giving your email address to the Washington Post and giving them consent to spam you. Please add a summary. – Philipp Dec 9 '16 at 14:09
  • I don't get any such prompt, and am able to read the content without providing any information. Maybe it's due to my adblocker. – smohyee Dec 10 '16 at 0:51
  • I think the Washington Post is one of the ones (also NY Times and Wall Street Journal) that allows you to see the first few articles for free but requires a subscription after that. So Philipp may just have clicked more links this month than you have. – Brythan Dec 10 '16 at 4:20

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