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On the White House website President Trump's administration posts a decidedly change in law enforcement priorities:

Standing Up For Our Law Enforcement Community

One of the fundamental rights of every American is to live in a safe community. A Trump Administration will empower our law enforcement officers to do their jobs and keep our streets free of crime and violence. The Trump Administration will be a law and order administration. President Trump will honor our men and women in uniform and will support their mission of protecting the public. The dangerous anti-police atmosphere in America is wrong. The Trump Administration will end it.

NBC's local affiliate covered the riots that occurred on the inauguration day as:

Demonstrations turned violent in the nation's capital as protesters clashed with police, damaged vehicles, destroyed property and set small fires in a chaotic confrontation blocks from Donald Trump's inauguration Friday. At least 217 people were arrested.

The article goes on to say the 217 people were arrested for rioting. It's also a federal offense to riot if you cross state lines.

Has there been any indication from the Trump Administration that some of these rioters will be charged with the federal crime given the priority Trump is placing on law and order?

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    This looks more like a statement than a question. You do have a question in there, but it is far from the most prominent feature of this post, and looks to me to be mostly a superficial change to give this post the form of a question. – Sam I am Jan 21 '17 at 19:26
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    @SamIam The rest is just background. What I am interested in is if Trump's DOJ is really going to be good on their word given the change in policy. Usually rioters get the catch and release treatment, or treated as a local matter. – K Dog Jan 21 '17 at 19:28
  • @SamIam So I am looking for public statements that speak to this issue. – K Dog Jan 21 '17 at 19:29
  • > Has there been any indication from the Trump Administration that some of these rioters will be charged with the federal crime given the priority Trump is placing on law and order? Nothing definitive yet. Sessions did say during his confirmation that he intends to uphold the law. and if the law says as you indicated, i would expect him to follow through. whether that's a priority for the administration is unknown at this point. personally i'm all for protesting peacefully but if you broke the law, you should be prosecuted. – dannyf Jan 21 '17 at 19:32
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    @K Dog. Okay, I've removed some of the distracting bits that are not crucial for people to understand the question. This is a bit more focused on the question now, I've reopened it. – Sam I am Jan 21 '17 at 19:32
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Yes, the Inauguration rioters will face federal charges according to CBS, which is much more than the DC law of max 180 days, $1000 fine that was rarely enforced.

Most of the approximately 230 protesters arrested on Inauguration Day will be charged with felony rioting, federal prosecutors said. 

The U.S. Attorney’s Office said the offense is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000. The office said most of those arrested will be released without having to post bail and must return to court in February. 

The protesters were armed with crowbars and threw objects at people and businesses, destroying storefronts and damaging vehicles. 

Six police officers were hurt -- three of them hit in the head with flying objects, CBS affiliate WUSA reported. According to the station, the six had minor injuries.

  • certainly good news for those people who protested peacefully. let those bad eggs see how protests should have been done right. – dannyf Jan 22 '17 at 14:44
  • those rioters don't like sponenous to me. I wonder if those who organized and supported such protests, knowing its violent intent, could be prosecuted. or the law applies only the actual rioters, not their backers. – dannyf Jan 22 '17 at 14:45
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    It applies to organizers and sponsors as well – user11168 Jan 22 '17 at 15:02

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