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According to Washington Post, Kim-Moon meeting was a historical event:

In 2016, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un threatened to strike the residence of South Korea's president with missiles, foreshadowing mounting tensions that have kept the world on alert ever since.

So, when Kim stretched out his hand and smiled at South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Friday, the scene could hardly have been more surreal.

The historic moment was the result of months of negotiations and pressure by both China and the United States, even though it remains unclear how far North Korea is willing to give in.

The same article mentions a small detail related to how this event is seen inside North Korea:

The summit was not broadcast live inside North Korea, and it remains uncertain how much of the friendly scenes North Koreans will be able to see.

Not broadcasting such a historical event involving the Supreme Leader seems strange.

Question: Why did North Korea not broadcast internally an historical event such as Kim-Moon meeting?

closed as off-topic by Wes Sayeed, user9389, Giter, Philipp Apr 28 '18 at 2:28

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for the internal motivations of people, how specific individuals would behave in hypothetical situations or predictions for future events are off-topic, because answers would be based on speculation and their correctness could not be verified with sources available to the public." – Community, Giter, Philipp
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    I'm voting to close as opinion-based. While this is a good question, I don't think it has an objectively verifiable answer. Much of what the Kim regime does serves only to solidify the legitimacy of his own dynasty and nothing more. We don't even know if the summit itself was Un being genuinely interested in peace, or if he's got some angle he's trying to play. Who knows what's going on in someone else's head? – Wes Sayeed Apr 27 '18 at 21:17
  • I would disagree. Who knows what's going on in someone else' head? Well, we sort of knows a lot. We know the fat buffon wants to live. We knows he wants to maintain his regime. An explanation how not broadcasting that could serve his goal would be beneficial. Not precise, but then, what is precise? – user4951 Apr 29 '18 at 2:31
  • @J.Chang this is not a question about someone's thoughts. It's a question about actions of the North Korean government. Which makes it appropriate for this site. – grovkin May 12 '18 at 21:49

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