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The BBC are reporting that the House of Commons and the House of Lords are fighting over whether or not the former should have a meaningful vote if the government fails to make a deal with the EU regarding Brexit.

I am confused.

It looks like this House of Lords is trying to force the House of Commons to accept that it has the power to have a 'meaningful vote' on the final Brexit deal, even though the House of Commons has said that it doesn't want that power.

Given the House of Commons has rejected the option of having a meaningful vote, why is there any point in the House of Lords trying to force it to have that option? Surely any argument used to convince MPs to vote against having the option to vote, would also convince MPs to vote the way the Government wanted?

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    Because the government is trying to bypass the parliament approval for any deal regarding Brexit. This means that should the government chose the "no-deal" option that would be binding. Notice that the HoC has not rejected the option of having a "meaningful vote". The "rebels" were given assurances that the issue would be discussed later. But it's becoming blatantly clear that a lot of MPs no longer trust the current administration. Particularly because a lot of them feel that the government has been somewhat "hijacked" by euroseptic hardliners. Time will tell if they are right. – armatita Jun 18 '18 at 16:14
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Given the House of Commons has rejected the option of having a meaningful vote, why is there any point in the House of Lords trying to force it to have that option? Surely any argument used to convince MPs to vote against having the option to vote, would also convince MPs to vote the way the Government wanted?

A few points:

a) There is theoretically a matter of principle here. This remains true whatever the outcome of the second vote is if it happens (Although I personally believe the HoL are voting as they do for the following reasons)

b) People's minds can change over time. A second vote will take place later.

c) Knowing there's going to be a future vote can help shape what remains of the negotiations. (Note that it also potentially effects the EU's side of negotiations as it would give them more clout on certain positions)

d) People find it easier to vote against (meaningful vote) than for (final), as voting for something makes you 'own' it.

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Apparently Ms. May promised a meaningful vote to some of her MPs, but then immediately reneged on it. The Lords are giving those MPs another opportunity to hold May to her word, or to rebel if she refuses.

Essentially the Lords are saying that the government has not fully dealt with this matter and must re-consider it in light of these events.

On a more technical point, the new amendment is slightly different to the old one so Parliament is being offered something slightly different to the first time.

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