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I was doing some research on gaslighting, when I came across the following in the Gaslighting article on Wikipedia:

Gaslighting can be seen as institutional and systematic. An article by Tuesda Roberts and D. Carter Andrews specifically focuses on African-American teachers, and attributes the severely low percentage of African-Americans in the teaching profession to "macro-level and micro-level laws and policies [that] have historically and contemporarily positioned the black educator as 'outsider' and as 'on the margins'", competent to teach Black students but not White students, a form of gaslighting reinforced by "the exodus of White educators from predominantly non-White schools".

Gaslighting as abuse of power and control goes far beyond relationships and into daily struggles. This type of societal gaslighting upon certain capabilities can have a serious effect on personal development. K.E. Portnow terms one form of self-doubt "developmental doubt", and says it is "linked to questions of identity formation in which epistemological complexity potentiated biographical, historical and thematic issues of self-doubt."

What kind of figures are we talking about? I mean what are the actual figures on black american representation as teachers, and what they ought to be given their representation as a whole in the population.

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    This seems more like a question for Skeptics.SE. This is also a different definition or use of 'gaslighting' than I've seen in common use. – Gramatik Jun 20 '18 at 14:25
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    I took Gaslighting out of the title, since it's highly misleading. Gaslighting usually means that someone with malicious intent is trying to convince you that events you are observing are signs that you are going insane. The term is derived from the movie Gaslight. The base question that it raises is on-topic – Machavity Jun 20 '18 at 14:49
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it belongs on Skeptics. – JonathanReez Supports Monica Jun 20 '18 at 19:13
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    This belongs on Academia... if not Quora. The percentage of AA in the US and the percent of those working in academia is a given statistic. Whatever can be otherwise extrapolated from that information is off topic for any SE site. – Mazura Jun 21 '18 at 1:36
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African-americans are 12.6% of the USA population. This table shows the breakdown of teachers for 2007-8, so its a bit out of date, but I doubt that the situation has changed greatly in the last 10 years. At that time 6.7% of teachers were "black, non-Hispanic". While there is no analysis of the correlation between black pupils and black teachers, the figures do show that black teachers are concentrated in city schools in poor areas (see the figures for free and reduced price lunches).

This supports the basic claim of racial disparity in the quoted text.

However the quoted text appears to be stretching the definition of "gaslighting" to breaking point. Wikipedia's definition of gaslighting is:

a form of psychological manipulation that seeks to sow seeds of doubt in a targeted individual or in members of a targeted group, making them question their own memory, perception, and sanity.

The quoted text attributes the low level of African-American teachers to "laws and policies" that have "positioned" them as unsuitable teachers for white pupils. While there is no doubt that American society tells black people that "you cannot succeed because you are black" in many ways, this does not fit the definition of gaslighting because it does not cause the victims to question their own memory, perception or sanity.

Furthermore, if a black teacher is teaching black pupils then this presents those pupils with a successful black role model. This actually counters the "gaslighting" thesis of the quoted text.

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    While there is no analysis of the correlation between black pupils and black teachers, the figures do show that black teachers are concentrated in city schools in poor areas The former somewhat defeats the latter. If black people themselves are concentrated in poor areas, then it stands to reason that black teachers are concentrated in poor areas as well. Unless you have any evidence to argue that teachers tend to not live in poor areas (e.g. this could easily be proven for CEO's) – Flater Jun 20 '18 at 13:30
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    This quote: While there is no doubt that American society tells black people that "you cannot succeed because you are black" in many ways sounds like a quote that would need a source. I don't doubt there's individuals who think that, regardless of whether it's true or not, but it's a rather bold claim that society as a whole tells that to black people. Not down voting because it's validity doesn't undermine your answer. – Gloweye Jun 20 '18 at 14:55
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    The question wasn't about the definition of gaslighting. If you disagree with that part of the Wikipedia exposition on the subject, the proper place to express that would be on that Wikipedia page's talk tab, not here. – T.E.D. Jun 20 '18 at 17:56
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    Your analysis does not include the percentage of AAs that are skilled enough and applied for teaching roles – K Dog Jun 21 '18 at 11:14
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    Also which laws the author is referring go unsaid, probably intentionally so. The 14th Amendment certainly contradicts his claim as do the entire body of law on civil rights beginning in 1954 – K Dog Jun 21 '18 at 11:17

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