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The statement released on 6th July 2018 by the UK Government from Chequers stated that the intention was to maintain a common rulebook for all goods and agri-food.

Will this enable the UK to allow imports from countries/other blocs (eg. the US) that do not follow or meet these rules (but instead meet other rulesets that we view as acceptable)?

Relevant bit of the statement:

The UK and the EU would maintain a common rulebook for all goods including agri-food, with the UK making an upfront choice to commit by treaty to ongoing harmonisation with EU rules on goods, covering only those necessary to provide for frictionless trade at the border. These rules are relatively stable, and supported by a large share of our manufacturing businesses. The UK would of course continue to play a strong role in shaping the international standards that underpin them, and Parliament would have oversight of the incorporation of these rules into the UK’s legal order – with the ability to choose not to do so, recognising that this would have consequences. We would strike different arrangements for services, where it is in our interests to have regulatory flexibility, recognising the UK and the EU will not have current levels of access to each other’s markets.

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If the UK maintains the same rules as the EU for goods and agri-food then it will not be able to import goods that do not meet those standards. This is important as it will mean there is no need for customs checks on those goods when moving from the UK to the EU.

The "consequences" they speak of for not implementing new EU rules are dire. A border would have to be created in Ireland and customs checks returned to all other ports. It seems to just be language designed to placate Brexit extremists, who of course saw through it immediately.

  • “Dire” and “extremist” are too emotive for my taste. – Ben Jul 10 '18 at 14:15
  • @Ben what would you prefer? – user Jul 10 '18 at 15:08
  • “important” and “supporter” – Ben Jul 10 '18 at 15:57
  • Important doesn't really capture the severity of what will happen, and lots of supporters take a much less extreme view. – user Jul 11 '18 at 6:39
  • Leavers believe the EU is a dire outcome and open borders within the EU to be extreme. Emotive language merely distracts from the argument. – Ben Jul 11 '18 at 8:35

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