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Netanyahu visited Oman on the invitation of Sultan Qaboos bin Syed.

Looks like Oman would be the 1st country in GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) to establish diplomatic relations with Israel.

What made Oman establish diplomatic relations with Israel and vice versa?

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  • Please explain GCC, or add a link. Google has LOTS of GCCs. – jamesqf Oct 28 '18 at 18:47
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    Because diplomatic relations is the normal state of affairs between sovereign countries, perhaps you should look at why the other GCC countries break the norm and avoid diplomatic relations. Then you may discover how Oman's decision is different from the others'. – Ben Voigt Oct 29 '18 at 0:23
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    The OP, user:23270, seems like a potential sockpupet, with an account description of "delete me". The question however seems interesting if supportable answers are proposed. – Burt_Harris Nov 4 '18 at 4:32
  • @Burt_Harris, what made you curious about my profile? – user23270 Nov 4 '18 at 10:42
  • @stackoverflow.com, The name used seems to imply an association with the organization, so I clicked on it. – Burt_Harris Nov 4 '18 at 18:34
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Normal countries want to have relationships with one another, because of economic and technological development, healthcare cooperation, academic development etc. This is how countries are not left behind as the world progresses.

The countries that have to be explained are the ones who refuse to forge ties with certain other countries.

When we are dealing with the question of "Why some Arab countries established open diplomatic ties with Israel". We are actually asking "Why did some Arab countries break the ban on establishing diplomatic ties with Israel" - What pushed them so hard that they had to do something which was considered taboo for so many years?

The short answer to this question is "Iran" and the loss of interest is the seemingly unsolvable Israeli/Palestinian conflict.

All Arab countries which have established open ties with Israel are stable Sunni-Muslim countries, who wish to live in peace and fear the Shiite Iran and its radical agenda.

Israel is seen by those countries, as the single strong nation on earth that will never ever allow Iran to actualize this agenda. No matter the stance of any particular American administration.

I can explain more if needed. Please write in comments your requests.

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Because there is a big standoff between Israel and Iran in the Middle-East. And minor, and especially tiny countries, seemingly are being forced to align with one of these countries.

All US-backed gulf states are moving towards Israel's side, mostly because of the Israel-U.S. alliance. The only exception (or, maybe looking like exception) is Turkey; it is trying to become a third regional leader in the Middle-East not aligned with the U.S.

Maybe, only maybe!, it is a probe by the Saudis; they may test Arabian-world reaction on such diplomatic act before establishing relations themselves.

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    its far more complex than just Iran, but that is definitely a major component – user19831 Oct 30 '18 at 12:35
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    Yes, there is some simplification in answer, but it is a real challenge, to describe all middle-east diplomatic labirnthian in one answer. – user2501323 Oct 30 '18 at 12:36
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    Can you provide something that shows this is the correct answer? Good answers are expected to be factually true, rather than speculative. – indigochild Oct 31 '18 at 15:36
  • It's hard to provide links which describes basis for some foreign country motivations. But if i'll ever been in Oman, I'll ask sultain about what they've wanted from it.) – user2501323 Nov 1 '18 at 6:10
  • As stands this answer seems completely speculative. If the speculation is yours alone, its doesn't seem particularly valuable, but if you can point to supporting evidence in terms of positions taken by notable persons or organizations, those references improve the answer because they can be verifiable facts, even if they don't prove the position is factually true. – Burt_Harris Nov 4 '18 at 4:23

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