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I early voted at a library in Irving, TX. I touched a straight Democratic ticket. The machine went straight to Republican.

I called the attendant and she reset the machine so I tried again. Straight Democratic ticket.

I have been a life time Democrat since I was 18 years old. If my vote went to a Republican it would kill me. How do I make sure my vote didn't go to Cruz?

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    I don’t believe you can. I’m sorry. Once a vote is submitted I believe it is impossible, by design, to tie it back to an individual. You use your name at the door so they can ensure you’re a registered voter, and have the right to vote, but once you’re in the ballot box, voting is anonymous. The idea is to design a system which makes it impossible for a hostile regime to retaliate against individuals or groups who didn’t support them at the ballot box (a painful lesson history had to teach us). But if your ticket was the way you liked it when you pulled the lever, you should be fine. – Dan Bron Nov 3 '18 at 13:51
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because we cannot answer questions about how specific precincts count their ballots. You should contact your Secretary of State if you have any questions or concerns – Machavity Nov 3 '18 at 14:06
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    The Texas SOS has this page about filing election complaints – Machavity Nov 3 '18 at 14:09
  • Thanks for your quick response. I am sure as I got to the end of my ticket it did say Dem. But I am still a little nervous about how the machine reacted at first. This election is very important to me – Wanda Lee Nov 3 '18 at 15:23
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A search online suggests the Dallas County machine in question might be an ES&S iVotronic, for which Texas requires no paper record.

image of ES&S iVotronic machine (no printout)

Verifiedvoting.org reports that the iVotronic has security concerns, and last week in North Carolina iVotronic machines had touchscreen calibration errors:

Some voters in Guilford County have found errors when reviewing their ballots before submitting them — namely that they meant to vote for a candidate of one party, but the machine marked their ballot for the other candidate.

Elections Director Charlie Collicut said the problem comes from the election machines’ touch screens. As some voters touched the screen, it would select the name above or below the candidate they actually wanted.

“It’s a machine that we have to calibrate — that a human being has to calibrate,” Collicut said, pointing out that the process isn’t perfect.

He instructed voters to try pressing a millimeter above or below the candidate name until the correct box is checked...
- NC Election Directors Urge Voters To Check Their Ballots After Touchscreen Mistakes By JESSA O'CONNOR • OCT 24, 2018

Unlike Texas, North Carolina requires by law that iVotronics machines output a paper receipt that shows the voter who they voted for.

Ten years ago (10/27/08) the Brennan Center for Justice sent a complaint letter to 16 Secretaries of State, (in states using iVotronics machines), that warned them of poorly calibrated touchscreens and "vote flipping".

So the answer depends on circumstances:

If an iVotronic machine hasn't been hacked or tampered with, and doesn't have other unknown backdoors or major bugs, then once its touchscreen has been calibrated correctly, it should probably be OK.


For those interested in further analysis of the ES&S iVotronics shortcomings, see:

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