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On the Washington Times election page there is a "State Tracker" panel with links to each state's results:

enter image description here

Each icon has a motif comprising blue and red fields with white stars on the blue field. I am wondering what, if anything, is the significance of the number of white stars for each state?

In particular, why does Wyoming have no stars?

I thought it might be stylistic - use as many stars as fit nicely in the blue space - but Wyoming doesn't follow that principle (nor does Connecticut and Utah though they at least have some stars). Another possibility might be to differentiate the icons (Wyoming with three stars would look like Colorado with three stars) but that doesn't seem satisfactory either since either could have two stars and be unique, and there are others that look similar and have the same star count.

This is probably an extremely pointless and trivial question but my curiosity overwhelms me. (By the way, I am Australian, so please forgive me if there is some answer that would be obvious if I was a US citizen.)

closed as off-topic by lazarusL, Martin Schröder, user4012, Burt_Harris, Philipp Nov 9 '18 at 11:46

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about governments, policies and political processes within the scope defined in the help center." – lazarusL, Martin Schröder, user4012, Burt_Harris, Philipp
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    Hawaii doesn't either, but the shape and size makes that less surprising. – Deolater Nov 7 '18 at 14:28
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    Honestly, my guess is that it was just an oversight by the artist. These aren't in anyway official flags, and they don't seem to do anything special with others. If they were, one would expect Texas, the Lone Star State, to have a single star, but it has two. – theresawalrus Nov 7 '18 at 20:14
  • Since it appears there might be no real reason, at least not a political reason, perhaps this question doesn't belong on Politics.SE. Can anyone suggest another SE? UX perhaps? Interestingly it seems to be a case of the topic depending on the answer, not the question. – andrew Nov 9 '18 at 0:13
  • I don't think that this is a question which belongs anywhere on Stack Exchange, because the only people who could answer this question are those who were involved in that feature on the Washington Times website. – Philipp Nov 9 '18 at 11:47
  • @philipp - Understood. When I asked this, I didn't know if they based the design on some specific political concept, or nothing at all (and nothing at all seemed somewhat odd and unlikely since it is so visually jarring to me). Now that the question has been considered by others, and no such political concept appears to exist, would it be best to delete the question? – andrew Nov 11 '18 at 1:05