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According to NDTV...

The aircraft dropped 1,000 kg laser-guided bombs on terror training camps, completely destroying them, reports said.

in the recent LoC incursion.

Does the IAF have 1000 kg smart bombs, or is this propaganda?

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    When they write laser-guided, doesn't that just mean there's someone in the field pointing a laser and a plane flies over and drops it on the laser targeted spot? – JJ for Transparency and Monica Feb 26 '19 at 21:13
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    Answers by Expert Knowledge are themselves insufficient without citation, since it constructs an empty Argument from Authority. – Drunk Cynic Feb 26 '19 at 21:13
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    I voted to close because there's no clear political implication behind this military hardware question. If you can explicitly link it to something relevant to the site, I might vote to reopen it. – Jared Smith Feb 27 '19 at 2:17
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    Instead of closing...perhaps you could edit to make it on-topic? – Cascabel Feb 27 '19 at 4:02
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    How is this a politics question? should be on Skeptics, if anywhere – user19831 Mar 4 '19 at 10:44
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According to this redacted CIA report from 2011, they didn't possess precision-guided munitions then, but were trying to acquire some. On page 14 of the PDF:

Because the Indian Air Force currently does not possess state-of-the-art bombing computers or precision-guided air-to-ground munitions, its contingency plans probably call for several sorties against each target to increase the chance of success. India is seeking precision-guided munitions for its aircraft, but, until such missiles are obtained, the Air Force would have to use its inventory of 225- and 450- kilogram bombs in a preemptive strike.

This article from 2016 reports about a domestic Indian firm that was beginning to produce precision guided weaponry locally. It also suggests that India was already importing such munitions at the time:

Emerging private firm OIS Advanced Technology (OIS-AT) will partner with Sagem of France to manufacture the munitions, which India currently import from Israel, France, Russia and the United States for its fighters.

It was also reported that India was able to broker a deal with Russia in 2018 to purchase 240 KAB-1500 bombs. According to Wikipedia the mass of each is "about 1,500 kg," with the previous source reporting that the bomb's warhead weights "1100 kilograms".

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  • Interesting...supposedly the IAF was already using the GBU-12 during the Kargil War in 1999....I see you are also getting DVed. Is this site that political? – Cascabel Feb 26 '19 at 20:22
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    @Cascabel Yes, but it suits the theme. Since they're just internet points it hardly matters, and I only generally notice it around really emotional topics. C'est la vie. – Jeff Lambert Feb 26 '19 at 20:43
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    @DrunkCynic Perhaps you should revise your criteria. " keeping to course where I downvote answers to questions I've downvoted." does not seem to be logical; only a downward spiral. It's like saying "I yam what's I am." – Cascabel Feb 26 '19 at 21:45
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    @DrunkCynic which of those categories do you think the question belongs to? It's not POB, it asks about a fact. It's clearly about government policy and it hasn't been asked before. Also, it's not too broad nor does it lack details to uniquely identify the problem. – JJ for Transparency and Monica Feb 27 '19 at 0:18
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    @DrunkCynic if anything this site is aimed at questions that can be answered by stating facts. Clearly, facts about military policy (like having certain weapons) are within the realm of politics. – JJ for Transparency and Monica Feb 27 '19 at 14:42
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According to Wikipedia, the Indian Air Force has had the Sudarshan laser-guided bomb in service since 2013. It's a 450kg laser-guided missile. Taking that into account, it doesn't seem that far-fetched that they have a 1000kg bomb now (6 years later).

Indeed laser-guided bombs aren't that special. From the same Wikipedia page:

Laser guided bombs were first developed by United States in 1960s. Later, Russia, France, and Britain also developed them. Laser-guided bombs are called "smart bombs" because they can follow a non-ballistic trajectory when laser designation of the intended target is done.

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  • Possible, but AFAIK, India is not producing their own laser-guided bombs. Especially in the 1000 kg range, and I cannot find evidence that they are buying them from a legitimate source. – Cascabel Feb 26 '19 at 21:21

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