8

On the 27th of March, the UK parliament has taken control of its own agenda in an attempt to break the so-called Brexit deadlock.

How many proposals are there and what are they?

  • @DenisdeBernardy please elaborate which of the criteria of good-faith as laid out on meta my question (or answer) does not satisfy. I posted the question because it was missing on Politics Se and I thought it was good to share my answer. In fact, I did not know at the time the speaker had selected amendments and as such at least one person (me) learnt something. Isn't that what SE is about? – JJ for Transparency and Monica Mar 27 at 21:03
  • Per my comment: "Or at the very least, the lack of research is too great". Speaker usually lets MPs know what's up for voting in the late afternoon UK time. theguardian.com/politics/live/2019/mar/27/… -- it's been all over the news and Twitter since. – Denis de Bernardy Mar 27 at 21:04
  • @DenisdeBernardy I don't think lack of research is a closing reason on this SE. It is a reason for down voting (try hovering over the down vote button), so feel free to do that. – JJ for Transparency and Monica Mar 27 at 21:13
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    I did that already. But just to clarify why, your question came 3 hours after the amendments got picked. Your question would have been great if you had put the actual answer to that directly. I'd have even upvoted both the question and your answer had you done that. Instead, you asked the question, and contributed an answer without having even Googled what the answer might be. And it was so wrong someone prompted you to edit it to correct what's getting voted on. Anyway, let's just leave it at that. Your other contributions to the site are great. – Denis de Bernardy Mar 27 at 21:15
  • @DenisdeBernardy thanks for the compliment but I really don't see what you are getting upset about. Even without my answer, the question stands regardless of when the options for voting would be picked. This site is not just for questions that are relevant in some very small time window, it also serves as a reference framework and aims to be a repository of knowledge (in this case on politics). With Brexit being an important issue, this is a relevant question now (to follow current affairs) or in the future (e.g. to support someone analysing the Brexit process). – JJ for Transparency and Monica Mar 27 at 21:22
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Dutch bank ING has an informative overview of the 16 options put forward by MPs:

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The first column, motion, indicates the 'number' by which the motions are referred to by many MPs in the debate in the House of Commons. The description column also indicates if motions are (likely to be) unacceptable to the EU.


As explained by Origimbo in a comment below, the speaker has selected only options B, D, H, J, K, L, M and O. Meaning 8 options are actually on the table.

Brexit options that will be voted on

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