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Are there international laws that compel Mexico to prevent migrants from crossing the border and into the U.S.? I am asking, because I am wondering if there's any legitimate grievance from the U.S., because from my understanding all they are required to do is not let people enter illegally under their noses at a border checkpoint, but they can't be legally required to not let anyone cross the border.

Also, I am wondering about cases where you have caravans carrying people who seek to escape poverty. Is there any law that tells you how a country must handle those situations?

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    International law is "whatever one gets away with in practice." USA is powerful enough to rewrite those laws.
    – Sjoerd
    Jun 1 '19 at 0:13
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    @Sjoerd - You're not wrong. I'd extend that even to domestic laws.
    – Obie 2.0
    Jun 1 '19 at 3:52
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    Isn't the issue having Mexico stop Country X citizens from crossing the X-Mexico border?
    – DJohnM
    Jun 1 '19 at 4:16
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    "from my understanding all they are required to do is not let people enter illegally under their noses at a border checkpoint": enter where illegally, Mexico or the US? Either way, I know of no relevant international law, but I highly doubt that there is anything compelling a country not to let certain people in. There might be something that requires some countries to regulate outbound traffic to a neighboring country, but I suspect that if there is, it is effected through bilateral agreements, and I highly doubt that Mexico and the US have concluded such an agreement.
    – phoog
    Jun 2 '19 at 19:12

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