1

I know which countries form the G8 Summit

The article reads G8 as

the main economic council of wealthy nations

Why is it that China and Arab nations are not part of these nations? Is it just Western Countries involved?

I know currently it is G7 as Russia is suspended.

  • Japan is a member according to your linked page. – dandavis Aug 28 at 18:42
  • @dandavis oops sorry, Japan is, that clears my doubt about Western Countries only, still why is China not included – Up-In-Air Aug 28 at 18:45
6

The Wikipedia page for the Group of Seven states an answer (emphasis added):

The G7 is composed of the seven wealthiest advanced countries. The People's Republic of China, according to its data, would be the second-largest with 16.4% of the world net wealth, but is excluded because the IMF and other main global institutions do not consider China an advanced country and because of its relatively low net wealth per adult and HDI.

The Arab nations are presumably do not make up any of the seven wealthiest advanced countries.

  • 2
    Maybe you could add something that when the G7 and G8 (G7 + Russia) were formed, China qualified even less. – Sjoerd Aug 28 at 19:21
11

The other answer seems to miss an important historical context here, also described on Wikipedia:

The organization was founded to facilitate shared macroeconomic initiatives by its members in response to the collapse of the exchange rate 1971, during the time of the Nixon shock, the 1970s energy crisis and the ensuing recession.

The G6 was formed in 1975 consisting of the France, (West) Germany, Italy, Japan, the UK, and the US; USSR and China were excluded at that time for perhaps obvious reasons. Economically, China in the 1970s was also nothing like economic China today. Canada was quickly added (G7), and then much later Russia (post-USSR collapse and with a growing economic relationship with Europe) to form the G8.

Russia is not considered an advanced country, either, by the IMF, and yet was part of the G8 until being suspended over the occupation/annexation of Crimea, so it seems incorrect to say that the IMF distinction is actually relevant: this is a club by invitation-only, not a prize obtained by meeting some specific criteria.

The G(#) remains mostly a Western economic meeting, with the inclusion of Japan being as much a geographical outlier as the exclusion of China, yet making sense based on shared economic interests from the 1970s.

  • 2
    THAT should be accepted answer. History overview nearly always describes international structures much better, than its formal definition. – user2501323 Aug 29 at 6:33
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    Japan as an outlier: Japan has a lot of western influence in its culture, especially with regard to the level of industrial and economic development, and, significantly, political alignment. – phoog Aug 29 at 13:06
  • @phoog Agreed. I don't think politically it is an outlier at all and makes perfect sense to include Japan based on economic interests, I really meant to just refer to geography, so I made an edit. – Bryan Krause Aug 30 at 18:40
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    If China joined, it would make it [even more] difficult for them to claim that they should still be considered a "developing country" status which at least through WTO gives them some privileges. – Tuomo Aug 31 at 13:14

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