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This question asks whether the British parliament could force the government to request an extension of EU membership, and the answer seems to be "No".

However, an answer there points out that

Member States are represented in the European Council by their Heads of State or Government

and the Queen is the head of state. Could parliament, by means of a humble address, request that the Queen request an extension from the EU? In particular, could this occur in the 14-day period after a vote of no confidence in the current government?

  • The "Head of State" intended there is the French President. The 5 other founders had either monarchs or ceremonial presidents as head of state, and sent their head of government instead. When the UK joined, it was obvious that they too would send their head of government. – MSalters Sep 2 at 11:04
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    Possible dupplicate of Can the Queen refuse to suspend the Parliament? – Bregalad Sep 2 at 12:42
  • I think that this differs from The Queen refusing to suspend parliament, because there she would be going against the advice of (some of) her privy councillors. Here, she would be going with protocol and acting according to the wish of the humble address. – emrys57 Sep 2 at 12:51
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    I know the Q is different, but the answer there would answer your question as well. That is, the Q's role is mostly ceremonial, and Her interveaning in political matters would create yet another unprecedented scandal. – Bregalad Sep 2 at 14:35
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    This is not the Queen exercising her own initiative. This is the queen acceding to a Humble Request duly passed by a majority of her House of Commons. Were the Queen to decline the request, that would be going against protocol, just as it would have been going against protocol to decline the PM's request to Prorogue parliament. – emrys57 Sep 3 at 14:13
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Member States are represented in the European Council by their Heads of State or Government

That does not mean you get to pick whoever suits you better on each occasion. The United Kingdom is represented by the Prime Minister, not the Queen.

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    That's definitely the realistic answer, but are there any laws or precedent to actually support that? – Bobson Sep 2 at 15:29

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