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With all this Brexit craziness going on, a no-Brexit scenario (withdrawal of article 50) sometimes pops up as a possibility.

In may we had European elections to elect the European Parliament. The British (being near Brexit date) didn't vote for these elections and as such don't have any representatives in the European Parliament. On top of that the seats for the European commission have also been divided between the "remaining" countries.

What would happen to the parliament and commission when the UK decides not to leave the EU?

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    "The British ... didn't vote for these elections" - actually, yes, we did, as we'd already pushed the deadline back to October 31st by that point.
    – F1Krazy
    Sep 19, 2019 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

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In may we had European elections to elect the European Parliament. The British (being near Brexit date) didn't vote for these elections

Yes we did, running European parliament elections in the UK was made a condition of a brexit extension and they were duly run and MEPs elected. The elections were organized in a rush resulting in many EU citizens in the UK and also Brits living in other parts of the EU being unable to vote to to bureaucratic failures. In the immediate aftermath of the election there was talk of legal challenges but I haven't found any evidence that any of those challenges actually went anywhere.

Other countries in the EU elected extra MEPs who will not get seats until/unless the UK leaves.

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  • Might be worth including something about the voting problems
    – Jontia
    Sep 19, 2019 at 14:30
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As an addendum, it is true that the UK declined to nominate a commissioner.

Sir Tim Barrow, head of the UK’s delegation to the EU, said in a letter to the Commission and Council that his government will not put forward a candidate’s name by today’s informal 26 August deadline.

In his Friday letter, Sir Tim cites Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s 25 July pledge not to pick someone to serve in Ursula von der Leyen’s incoming administration, which is set to take office on 1 November.

[...]

But what remains less clear is what would happen if the UK requests and is granted an extension to the 31 October deadline, given that the new Commission is likely to be largely on the starting grid by the time the next Council summit is held on 17 October.

Current UK representative Sir Julian King, a politically unaffiliated diplomat tasked with the security union portfolio, could yet be reappointed to be a place-holder during an extension period, although the tone of Friday’s letter makes it less likely the decision can be rolled back.

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