6

According to Wikipedia (citing http://www.namisum.com), the "Naminara Republic" declared itself as a country:

the "passport" issued from Naminara is required in order to enter Namisum. It declared itself a self-governing country in 2006

Is the Naminara Republic recognized by any nation?
Is it tolerated by South Korea?

Naminara Republic flag Naminara Republic in South Korea

7

No other country (here I am using UN membership as a definition) has official diplomatic ties with this notional micro state. Therefore the answer is, "no, it is not recognized by any other nation"

South Korea in particular does not recognize any sovereignty, so them it is just a claim not worth dealing with. An individual can add any restrictions he wants to people entering his property, but if this republic were to seek to deviate from South Korean law, the cops would get involved.

The situation is mostly likely akin to the "conch republic" of key west. A notional idea at best, but don't try to go against the cops with a blockade.

It is possible that other non-member micro states may choose to recognize this one, but by the common definition of country that the general public would recognize- ie ones generally recognized- the answer is no.

3
  • 3
    Not having diplomatic relations does not mean non-recognition!
    – Anixx
    Sep 3 '14 at 23:31
  • 2
    Um, yes it does. That is the definition of recognition. It need not necessarily be a full on ambassadorial post, but if there is no diplomatic relationship there is no recognition. Even countries who have withdrawn their ambassadors have relations. Sep 3 '14 at 23:46
  • 1
    not having embassies means not having diplomnatic relations. For instance, the USSR dropped diplomatic relations with Israel, but still recognized it and Israel had consulates in the USSR. Most countries do not have diplomatic relations with, say, Tuvalu.
    – Anixx
    Sep 4 '14 at 1:50
6

The "Naminara republic" is as independent of South Korea as Disneyland is of the USA.

It is a theme park expressing a vision of being a magical, fairy-tale world. Part of this pretence is the notion of it being an independent republic. But the flag, the money, the passports, this is all part of the kayfabe, not "real".

The island only claims "cultural independence" and not "political independence" or "sovereignty".

So treat the idea that Naminama is an independent state on the same level as the idea that there is a real man sized mouse walking around a park in California. It is a bit of fun. As long as it stays a bit of fun, Korea is happy to play along.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .