1

I'm not sure if this goes on this exchange, or perhaps the economic exchange. I could move it if you guys want.

Anyway,

Should politicians, mainly presidents/prime ministers be heavily educated in the field of economics?

Politicians are obviously educated about politics. But should they be educated on economics? Economy could be as one would say the driving force of society today. Money makes the world go around.

So should politicians be heavily educated in the economic field?

  • 2
    It sounds like you’re asking for opinion, or trying to spark a discussion. That’s not really what this site is built for, so it will likely be closed as opinion based. – divibisan Nov 29 '19 at 5:30
  • Might I suggest adjusting the wording to ask about whether such requirements have been implemented anywhere, and whether such an implementation has been seen to be successful? – Glen O Nov 29 '19 at 7:54
  • It is hard to find an argument against politicians (or people in general) being more educated in any field, let be it economics or laws or sociology or ecology or physics or chemistry or art or classical language or ... The issue would be the cost or if it implementing it as a restriction (if you do not pass the examen you cannot hold office) means a lack of representation (by only allowing those who hold a certain POV/have more extensive formal education). – SJuan76 Nov 29 '19 at 8:34
  • Related: politics.stackexchange.com/questions/34419/… – Jontia Nov 29 '19 at 15:43
6

Running a modern state gets so complicated that the key qualification for heads of government is to manage a staff of advisers, the ability to take advice, and the political judgement to manage competing claims for budget and attention.

By your reasoning, each prime minister should be a climate scientist, too, and an IT professional, and a teacher, and so on. This is obviously impossible, so why single out economics for special attention?

  • Add to that the fact that economists tend to not agree with each other on good policy. Being competent in IT helps you make objectively better IT decisions. Knowing economics might teach you what different scholls think but does not really give you any objectively good criteria. – quarague Nov 29 '19 at 11:46