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In the UK House of Commons, the Speaker can only vote to break ties. The Deputy Speakers do not take part in partisan politics either, and can only raise constituency concerns.

Now, suppose the composition of the Parliament is similar to the one elected in 2017, where the government lost a number of votes. If the Speaker is formerly a member of the party in government, as well as all the Deputy Speakers, won't that cause issues for the party in power? As they lose a few crucial votes which would have come from those members.

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If the Speaker is formerly a member of the party in government, as well as all the Deputy Speakers, won't that cause issues for the party in power? As they lose a few crucial votes which would have come from those members.

The Speaker and the Deputy Speakers are drawn from opposing sides of the house such that the net effect of lost votes is 0 (I.E. both the government and opposition lose 2 votes):

Members number the candidates in order of preference and the votes are counted under the single transferable vote system, with the constraints that two Deputy Speakers (the Chairman of Ways and Means and the Second Deputy Chairman) should come from the opposite side of the House to that from which the Speaker was drawn, that the First Deputy Chairman should come from the same side of the House as that from which the Speaker was drawn

See Erskine May (as ever)

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