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Not sure if this is more fit on History, but Finland politics offered an interesting situation - all coalition parties are led by women:

I am wondering if this is the first time when it happens. Criteria for precedent:

  • after 1900
  • European country
  • a coalition made of at least two parties
  • all the leaders are women (also the PM)
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    Why exclude single party governments? Usually those are just coalitions in disguise, with "factions" inside the parties functioning as "coalition parties." – Sjoerd Jan 10 '20 at 16:35
  • @Sjoerd - I thought such cases are not that rare as virtually any female PM leading a government will obey the restrictions. – Alexei Jan 10 '20 at 16:50
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    Apparently women in leading positions isn't rare. Excluding this common case makes it look like you want confirmation that something unique is happening in Finland.. – Sjoerd Jan 10 '20 at 16:54
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    And to give a potential answer in comments: It wouldn't surprise me if Iceland has seen this before (they have a high percentage of female politicians) - but I can't find enough details to verify. – Sjoerd Jan 10 '20 at 16:56
  • @Sjoerd it is true that single party governments often have factions within them but they are not as formalised as parties so including such factions in the question makes it very hard to answer. – Magnus Jørgensen Jan 12 '20 at 12:48
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I can name one example: Denmark in 2012-2014.

From 2011 to 2015 Denmark was led by a coalition government between the Social Democrats (S), Socialist People's Party (SF) and the Social Liberal Party (RV) (actually SF left the coalition in early 2014).

S had Helle Thorning-Smidt as party leader she was also prime minister, RV had Margrethe Vestager and in 2012 SF changed their party leader to Anette Vilhelmsen. Then all three parties had a female leader. This only lasted until mid 2014 when Margrethe Vestager became a commissioner in the European Commission and left her position as party leader.

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