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I read how Esperanto is recognized by the United Nations and is popular in certain parts of the world. The United Nations has also begun presenting the The UNESCO Courier, its widest ranging publication in Esperanto. The publication is only published in eight other major languages and is the largest publication for world unity and scientific knowledge. The UN also provides an office for Universal Esperanto Association, an organization for promoting Esperanto, at the New York City UN building that could be used by other organizations.

While Esperanto is a great auxiliary language and it is great that it is being recognized, it is not an official primary or secondary language in any nation and it is not used in political/diplomatic discourse. I understand that Esperanto is pretty culturally and historically significant so it makes sense to acknowledge it, but my question is more about the extent of its recognition since there are plenty of important languages and non-government organizations that are as culturally significant (if not arguably more so) than Esperanto; yet many other important languages don't get any United Nations publications and many other important NGOs don't get close to getting an office in the United Nations building. So, I believe my question is why does Esperanto get recognized to the extent that it has its own translation for a magazine normally reserved for languages with hundreds of millions of speakers and a UN office for the non-profit organization based around it?

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    Why should a language have any official use in international discourse to be recognized by the UN?
    – yannis
    Feb 16 '20 at 21:25
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    What resources? Recognized - as I understand it - just means the UN recognizes that the language exists and is in use by a somewhat large number of people. Is the UN doing anything at all to preserve Esperanto in any way?
    – yannis
    Feb 16 '20 at 21:32
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    The United Nations has begun presenting the The UNESCO Courier, its widest ranging publication in Esperanto. The publication is only published in eight other major languages and is the largest publication for world unity and scientific knowledge. The UN also provides an office for Universal Esperanto Association, an organization for promoting Esperanto, at the New York City UN building that could be used by other organizations.
    – Tyler Mc
    Feb 16 '20 at 21:55
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    That information should probably be in the question. That said, UNESCO's focus is on cultural significance, not political significance. The fact that Esperanto has no official use internationally is irrelevant to UNESCO's mission.
    – yannis
    Feb 16 '20 at 22:04
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    I'm not sure Esperanto any longer serves as an "international language" as was the claim of its inventor in 1887. It is essentially a Romance language, with a large proportion of its vocabulary based on Spanish. How do the Chinese (one quarter of the earth's population) feel about that?
    – WS2
    Feb 17 '20 at 19:35
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Wikipedia Answer;

Esperanto was added as a United Nations auxiliary language at a UNESCO general conference in Montevideo in Uruguay on December 10, 1954.

The result is attributed to a long campaign by Esperanto speaker Ivo Lapenna to get it recognized.

There's likely more details, but it seems that the Esperanto scene at the time had a lot of the same goals as UNESCO, appeared to be in use around the world, and many UN member states expressed intent to start teaching the language.

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