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It's been asserted in another answer here that:

Marxism is, of course, part of the spectrum of Liberal ideologies, though it is often maligned as being something 'other.'

Looking at the SEP page on Liberalism it does indeed start with spectrum-like notion:

Liberalism is more than one thing. On any close examination, it seems to fracture into a range of related but sometimes competing visions.

But Marxism is only mentioned once on the page, and not in an inclusive manner:

During and after the Second World War the idea that liberalism was based on inherently individualist analysis of humans-in-society arose again. Karl Popper’s The Open Society and its Enemies (1945) presented a sustained critique of Hegelian and Marxist theory and its collectivist and historicist, and to Popper, inherently illiberal, understanding of society.

So, in what sense is Marxism liberal and who considers it so? (By "who" I mean to ask if there any notable thinkers/theorists/movements etc. that hold such a view, i.e. classify Marxism as part of liberalism spectrum in some fashion.)

Clarification: since liberalism is a contested term, I'm being very liberal here in the sense that answers can pick their your favorite sense of "liberal" that might make the opening statement true. I.e. this isn't a "is Y an X: true or false?" kind of question, but "since by my choice of X I'm flummoxed by this statement that, I let you chose an X for which you think this is true, but please explain your reasoning." Of course, I expect an answer to still choose an X that is not completely idiosyncratic to this question, like say X = Marxism, making the statement trivially true, but some that is verifiable use of the term outside this question. I.e., if the answer is "it's true on Fox News because of the US usage of the terms", then that's a valid answer as far as I'm concerned, although a bit boring.

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    Downvoted because the question is fundamentally unanswerable without a definition of "liberal" that we can all agree on. The word meant different things at different times, and still means different things to different people. For instance, the Wikipedia article starts out by saying "Liberals... generally support free market, free trade, limited government, individual rights... capitalism...", but most US liberals are to greater or lesser degree opposed to all of those things: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberalism In US discourse, their liberal is much closer to a libertarian. – jamesqf Feb 27 at 4:15
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    @jamesqf: I'm being very liberal here: you can pick your favorite sense in which Marxism is liberal in answering the question. This isn't a "is X true or false" kind of question, but "since by my choice of X I'm flummoxed by this statement, I let you chose an X for which you think this is true." Of course, I expect an answer to still choose an X that is not completely idiosyncratic to this question, like say X = Marxism, making the statement trivially true, but some X that is verifiable use of the term outside this question. – Fizz Feb 27 at 7:15
  • @jamesqf: I.e., if the answer is "it's true on Fox News" because of the US usage of the terms, then that's a valid answer as far as I'm concerned, although a bit boring. – Fizz Feb 27 at 7:20
  • I'm inclined to agree with @jamesqf as political science terms carry different meanings from coloquial usage. Liberalism does need to be defined by the asker as the Academic definition is different than the coloquial usage and places on the Left-Right spectrum differently in different nations too. In the U.S. Liberalism is associated with political left, but in most of Europe, Liberals are center right. Won't down vote however. – hszmv Feb 27 at 14:51
  • @jamesqf: Just making sure that your last sentance is refering to U.S. Libertarian, which is something entirely different from a European Libertarian (the former believes "some" government is necessary. The later does not... and there are other differences). – hszmv Feb 27 at 14:54
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Marxist humanism is a very liberal (in American way) interpretation of the work of Karl Marx, especially the Paris Manuscript and his early theory of alienation.

Most of the authors whose books inspired liberal 1968 student revolt self-described themselves as Marxist humanists, e.g. Herbert Marcuse or Wilhelm Reich. Their new political movement called New Left shifted Marxists' attention from class struggle towards social issues such as civil and political rights, feminism, gay rights, abortion rights, gender roles and drug policy reforms.

Freudo-Marxism borrowed from Freud the theory of conflict between the individual and civilization. Marxists attempt to liberate people by creating a non-repressive society.

Also, some liberal feminist movements are inspired by the unfinished book of Karl Marx published by Engels. The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State

Marxism attempts to liberate people from work, culture, religion, and morality therefore it is a liberal ideology.

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    I upvoting this, but looking at the (first) Wikipedia page you linked "Marxist humanism" seems based on ignoring the latter works of Marx, especially his Capital, which most people would consider his most influential. So I think this answer is a bit misleading. – Fizz Feb 28 at 7:36
  • Speaking of Wikipedia pages and its take on US liberalism, interestingly neither "Modern liberalism in the United States" nor "social liberalism" (which is presented as wider-world version of US liberalism) mention Marx much... There's one passing mention on each page. Another, more historically oriented page "Liberalism in the United States " doesn't mention Marx at all. – Fizz Feb 28 at 7:50
  • @Fizz Marxist humanists claim that there is no distinction between young and mature Marx. The critiques point out that there is a major difference. There is a mention of Marxist humanism in these articles, it's called "New Left": "advocacy for social issues such as civil and political rights, feminism, gay rights, abortion rights, gender roles and drug policy reforms." Isn't that the liberalism today? – obdi Feb 28 at 9:30
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    Marxism attempts to liberate people from work, culture, religion, and morality therefore it is a liberal ideology. That makes no sense, we could say that of every ideology. We can say that authoritarian ideologies attempt to liberate you from choice, anarchism and libertarians liberate you from the government. Every ideology is attempting to liberate you from something but you wouldn't call them liberal – Luis Rico Mar 2 at 12:56
  • @Luis Rico term ideology was coined by Marx and Engels. Ever since Rousseau freedom is a moral obligation. All new ideologies attempt to fix society by providing more freedom to people. Maxists after the war concluded that eventually automation will be able to provide all goods that people need, so they focused on liberating humans from oppressive society 'be your self'' being their motto. An example is 'sexual revolution', named after the book of Marxist Wilhelm Reich. If that is not liberalism then what is? – obdi Mar 2 at 15:52

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