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In 1991 after the collapse of the Soviet Union, former states of the Soviet Union needed to change its economical and political state models to suit the capitalist market economy. One of the major transformation effects were the privatization of formerly state-owned companies and property. The legal state of former Soviet Union countries was terrible at the beginning of the 90s, corruption levels in the governments were giant and organized crime was at its peak. Most of the privatizations were done very shadily, even illegally without any legal procedures and determinations, the rights to sell state-owned companies went to powerful people, mostly connected to dissolving communist party.

Some of those individuals made hundreds of millions of dollars, compared to today's money purchasing power even billions of dollars.

Usual buyers of those formerly state-owned companies were from the west in the form of corporate/institutional investments or private investors.

What was the view of the American/Western European corporate sector and governments on this process of privatization and were there a general belief of money to be made on dysfunctioning state systems and lack of knowledge about capital markets? Was this viewed as the beginning of globalization? Or did the western companies just wanted to take their market share early on, have their management teach the local people how to effectively manage daughter companies of multinational corporations?

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    The Wikipedia article on privatization in Russia makes me wonder if any such opportunities existed in the first place. Also, maybe a better question for History SE. – Brian Z May 1 '20 at 13:52
  • @BrianZ From my experience people in the interest of politics and economics have the best info about this. – Patrick May 1 '20 at 16:29
  • "Usual buyers of those formerly state-owned companies were from the west in the form of corporate/institutional investments or private investors." [citation needed] – Fizz May 1 '20 at 20:11