1

I saw another question asking why Bernie Sanders has a high approval among Republicans. I wrote in the comment that it could be because of racial bloc voting in the south where most whites vote Republican.

It has been described as being something from New England to be a liberal Republican. But I am contradicting this idea. What I mean is that just like a significant number of black Democrats are conservatives, I am saying a significant number of white Republicans in the Deep South are liberals. Is this an accurate analysis?

I could be wrong because the South is a more conservative region and the white voters don't vote republican at the same rate that the blacks vote democrat even in the south.

  • New england republican definition: wnpr.org/post/… – Number File Aug 22 '20 at 15:25
  • 1
    N.B. that many rural votes are deeply suspicious of "Washington Insiders". It's as good an explanation as any for why my state enthusiastically embraced Obama (twice), and then just as enthusiastically embraced Trump, the irrational hatred of e.g. Hillary Clinton (went waaay beyond just not liking her politics), etc. Bernie is definitely not a traditional fedgov type. – Jared Smith Aug 24 '20 at 11:40
  • You say you're from Indiana. It embraced Obama once. Barely. – Michael Mormon Aug 24 '20 at 13:11
  • I believe that Sanders had a core group of supporters that didn't necessarily align with each other. There were ones who wanted very liberal government policies. Then there were those who were against the traditional establishment and the crony-capitalism influence on government. That was part of the argument that Sanders was well-matched to beat Trump, because he could peel away those voters who were conservative, but anti-establishment, first and foremost. – PoloHoleSet Aug 24 '20 at 13:50
  • @MichaelMormon huh, thought it went blue in 2012 as well. I still stand by the point though, that's a pretty common attitude here. – Jared Smith Aug 25 '20 at 11:20
5

Not really, according to the CCES 2018 data. For each state, I've looked at the proportion of the voting population which identifies as a Republican (pid7) and which also self-identifies as liberal (CC18_334A). Below are the results, plotted firstly as a proportion of the general voting population, and then as a proportion of the Republican population.

The top five states as a proportion of the voting population are Oklahoma (2.4%), Iowa (1.9%), Kentucky (1.6%), Hawaii (1.5%), and Rhode Island (1.4%). As a proportion of Republicans, the top five states are Rhode Island (6.8%), Hawaii (6.5%), Oklahoma (4.5%), Iowa (4.2%), and Connecticut (4.0%).

enter image description here

Data:

State,% of Voters,% of Republicans
RI,1.428,6.816
HI,1.531,6.482
OK,2.405,4.515
IA,1.854,4.159
CT,1.232,3.963
NM,1.137,3.959
IL,1.336,3.568
GA,1.414,3.200
KY,1.551,2.903
ME,0.979,2.862
PA,1.070,2.442
ND,1.241,2.361
CA,0.651,2.258
NY,0.642,2.214
MI,0.826,2.123
MN,0.821,2.104
WV,0.965,2.096
NE,1.103,2.047
IN,0.918,1.835
NC,0.779,1.835
FL,0.773,1.811
OR,0.709,1.787
NV,0.639,1.697
TX,0.742,1.670
WI,0.729,1.583
CO,0.565,1.456
ID,0.799,1.388
MD,0.411,1.325
OH,0.583,1.268
TN,0.665,1.258
AL,0.603,1.230
NJ,0.398,1.158
SD,0.734,1.123
UT,0.575,1.050
AR,0.540,1.027
MS,0.491,1.004
NH,0.403,0.985
MA,0.223,0.905
VT,0.296,0.893
WA,0.334,0.890
VA,0.292,0.763
WY,0.537,0.723
LA,0.266,0.618
MO,0.247,0.509
KS,0.222,0.458
AZ,0.197,0.446
SC,0.103,0.216
AK,0.000,0.000
DE,0.000,0.000
DC,0.000,0.000
MT,0.000,0.000

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .