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According to the Pew Research center, young people in the USA leaned heavily towards voting for Democrats in the 2018 election. enter image description here Notable are not only the 2018's (Compared to because of its historic turnout for a midterm election) margins, but the 2016's as well. Considering how unfavorably Hillary Clinton fared with young people compared with Bernard Sanders, it is highly unlikely those would ever vote for a Republican candidate (And possibly they abstained from voting at all in 2016).

This should not mean only the young are unlikely to change their party in current times: 94%/96% of people who voted for the Republican/Democratic presidential candidate in 2016 will do so again 2020.

   - Presidential Elections (Wikipedia) -
      Dem    Rep
2012: 60%    36% (Age 18-24)
      60%    38% (Age 25-29)
      55%    42% (Age 30-39)
      48%    50% (Age 40-49)
2008: 66%    32% (Age 18-24)
      66%    31% (Age 25-29)
      54%    44% (Age 30-39)
      49%    49% (Age 40-49)
2004: 54%    45% (Age 18-29)
      46%    53% (Age 30-44)
2000: 47%    47% (Age 18-24)
      49%    46% (Age 25-29)
      48%    50% (Age 30-49)

As far as I could find numbers, this "blue-shift" started in 2008, as before then the youth didn't vote that differently from the rest of the country, or it swung every few years.

Is this age gap unprecedented since WW2 in the United States, and can we assume it to be a persistent change of views in the American public? What ramifications - if any - will it cause in the foreseeable future?

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