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From Donald Trump's rally in Iowa, skimming through the speech I catch the following phrases:

"I talked to someone, he said..." (about 20x).

"If you want to save your child, ..."

"Under my leadership, ..."

This is inconsequential to my question. It's there to show I made an effort to find the quote but haven't the patience to wade through hours of campaign speech to find this quote from the rally. I did want to provide a full source.

"I get home, I turn on the television, they talked about your floods in Iowa, they talked about, how's Iowa doin' the crops? How's thist happening? How they doing in Florida how the... three four stories one after another, where's my Nobel peace prize they don't talk about."

Granted, this last clip is selected for a comedy show, but:

The leader is doing a rally in Iowa, and pales the importance of floods and bad crops in Iowa to news about himself.

In most countries, this would be advised against as an inept move by a campaign manager; you would be saying that you don't care about the province you're hoping to win over. However true, specifically bringing up the recent negative and impactful news from the constituency and dismissing them would normally cost votes, not gain them.

Comedy is fine, but is it a question of "political climate", "sticking to your side", or some such phenomenon that would let statements like this slide?

That is to say: in Politics, in what way could statements like these be considered furthering a political campaign?

  • 3
    VTC Referring to a campaign appearance as a "comedy show" appears to discredit the politician. In any case, this question is likely to be answered by opinion rather than facts. – Rick Smith Oct 17 at 22:43
  • I don't know what VTC is. The first link is to the full rally speech, the second to the clip commented upon in a comedy show. I will edit the question to be even more crystal clear. – Henrik Erlandsson Oct 17 at 23:40
  • Question edited to make it even more crystal clear. – Henrik Erlandsson Oct 17 at 23:41
  • VTC means Vote To Close. If five higher rep users find reason to close the question, others will be prevented from answering the question until it is reopened. Now, by "this last clip is selected for a comedy show", did you mean "was selected"? If so, how does that support the question; that is, how is it relevant? I would suggest removing the references to "comedy" to improve the question. – Rick Smith Oct 18 at 0:12
  • @RickSmith why would I improve the question for you? You voted to close it before you suggested edits. It reads perfectly; it's you who can't take a meaning. I link the full speech, and the portion selected. I show I made efforts to link the clip without reference to the comedy show. – Henrik Erlandsson yesterday

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