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After watching this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZWRhLW7Y8w, I was surprised that US Constitution effectively does not protect country from stop being democratic. Will actions described in video (for example, using US Army to hold the power) be lawful and constitutional?

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    Define "legitimate". Do you mean without breaking any laws, without being unconstitutional or do you mean whether it can physically be done? Also, is your question based on the assumption that the constitution is the only existing line of defense against things that aren't legitimized? If you're asking whether this is constitutional or not, then of course the constitution is the only relevant source. But if you're asking about legitimacy, that's a different ballgame. – Flater Nov 17 '20 at 12:10
  • “Constitution effectively does not protect country from stop being democratic.” — Strongly disagree. Why do you think so? – gen-ℤ ready to perish Nov 17 '20 at 16:42
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No.

It does not matter if President Trump never concedes this election. If, as expected, a majority of the Electoral College votes votes for Mr. Biden, then Trump's term will end on January 20.

The machinery of the federal government, including the armed forces will recognise Biden, and not Trump, as the President, and will act accordingly.

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  • Wouldn't that be a felony if military won't follow orders of President in power? > "The machinery of the federal government, including the armed forces will recognise Biden" What is the base for your assumption? What stops current military like National Guard from forcing President to do what he has to? What defines the deadline when armed forces can switch serving from current President to President Elect? Is there any? – Askar Kalykov Nov 17 '20 at 10:06
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    @AskarKalykov "Wouldn't that be a felony if military won't follow orders of President in power?" That question hinges on the definition of "in power". As per this answer, assuming the majority Electoral College votes for Biden, Biden would be the president in power come Jan 20, regardless of who physically sits in the chair in the Oval Office. Concession is not a necessity for that power to transfer from one elected official to the next. – Flater Nov 17 '20 at 12:13
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    @Flater has it: Regardless of anything else, Trump's first term automatically ends on Jan 20th when the certified winner of the 2020 election is officially sworn in. He does not have a say in this; it happens whether or not he's present, or whether or not he acknowledges it. – Shadur Nov 17 '20 at 13:07
  • Most importantly, the police will recognize Biden as President, and will, if necessary, arrest Mr. Trump for trespassing in the White House. – Mark Nov 17 '20 at 23:13
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The Electoral College is part of the constitution.

But if this time the Electoral College can't state a winner, maybe because one or more states have two delegations claiming to be the correct one, then the decision is transferred. If there the GOP has the majority, ...

The constitution is older than the internet, so it doesn't consider everyone knowing how the states had really voted.

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