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Fishing has been the last issue blocking the ratification of the Brexit and is seemingly the primary reason why Iceland and Norway have refused to join the EU. But why is the fishing lobby so powerful? It's not a very profitable industry and not that many people are employed there, so on the surface it would seem that they should lack the resources to lobby the government effectively compared to other industries.

So why is the fishing lobby so powerful?

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    It may be more a cultural/identity thing than a powerful lobby of the industry. It also touches a lot of sovereignty issues - granting "foreigners" access to the natural ressources in "their" waters is something countries want to retain control about.
    – Hulk
    Jan 5 at 9:52
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    Plus, most western European countries do have significant coastlines they care about, and long traditions negotiating/fighting about who gets to control which area.
    – Hulk
    Jan 5 at 10:17
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    Norway is somewhat unusual. If not for the oil and gas the main export product before that except fish were electric energy, a assortment of ores, forest products and shipping ie seamen working abroad or norwegian owned or controlled freight ships. Jan 7 at 17:22
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    Historically Norway were after the middle ages plagues controlled by outside elites, danish from then (due to the union between Norway and Denmark) until 1814 when the union between Sweden and Norway were enforced by the victors in the Napoleon wars. A liberal bourgeois elite were by that time already prepared to take control but were partly sidestepped until the last half of the 1800s. The union ceased in 1905. Jan 7 at 17:29
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    In the case of Iceland a rather large part of the work force is employed in fishery. Jan 7 at 17:32

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