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I'm watching a documentary about the right-wing rise in Germany

Here they are speaking about a bar called ''Die Patriotische Bar'' and they happend to have some flags on the ceiling.

I couldn't understand what flag is the one on the left, it has a crescent and a David star.

enter image description here

Google research showed some simple results.

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    If anyone else is curious, the yellow flag on the right is that of the Identitäre Bewegung. – Fizz Mar 1 at 6:13
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    @Fizz: There's also a yellow Flemish flag in the back (with the black lion). – MSalters Mar 1 at 11:44
  • Whether this question and others like it are on-topic is being discussed on Meta – divibisan Mar 1 at 20:37
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    @MSalters: that one can't be seen too well in the frame, but it seem to lack the red bits, which seem to suggest it's a flag of the "Flemish Movement" rather than one of the other variations on the Flag of Flanders. – Fizz Mar 2 at 5:41
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The angle of the photo is pretty bad, but the star isn't actually David's star (despite the six points): note the steeper angles. Also there is a smaller star-like symbol "under" the crescent. All these point to the Coat of arms of Halle an der Saale, Germany (1327), or at least something derived from that.

enter image description here

Actually Wikipedia even gives the flag in the city article, which has different proportions between the two stars, matching what's seen in the photo:

enter image description here

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    For curiosity's sake, see also Leliwa coat of arms which--in some but not all renderings--uses a star geometrically more similar to David's star inside a crescent. – Fizz Mar 1 at 3:51
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    Note that the town is simply called “Halle” nowadays. – Relaxed Mar 1 at 17:47
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    @Relaxed Some people add "an der Saale" to distinguish it from the (smaller) Halle (Westf). – Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 2 at 0:21
  • @PaŭloEbermann Honestly never heard it called that. If you don't know it or there is any ambiguity, it would be just as common to add “in Sachsen-Anhalt”. If you want to distinguish with the city in Belgium, you would probably say “Halle in Germany”. Meanwhile the name is still “Halle” and that's what it's most commonly called. – Relaxed Mar 2 at 7:46
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    @Relaxed I guess the more official name is "Halle (Saale)", the "an der" is just a way of pronouncing the parentheses. (You can see this name being used on the city's website too: halle.de/en/Home or halle.de/de/Verwaltung/Presseportal/Nachrichten/… – the name is always followed by the (Saale).) Of course, where there is no ambiguity, people omit it. – Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 2 at 15:35

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