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I'm sure left-wing Israelis don't like Trump, so I'm more curious about Israelis on the political right. Trump has supported the goals of the Israeli right, such as an undivided Jerusalem, recognition of the Golan Heights as part of Israel, and voiding of the nuclear deal with Iran.

I'm asking because Trump has gained support from Nazis. That sounds hyperbolic, but there are news articles about self-described Nazis, swastikas and all, participating in the attempted coup on January 6th. That was only the most egregious example - from the beginning of his presidency, he received support from far-right antisemites of all kinds and refused to unambiguously condemn them, for example in the Charlottesville riot. Obama summarised Trump's response to the latter as 'How hard can it be to say "Nazis are bad"?'

Edit: the only answer and many comments so far say something like of course it's a contradiction, but Trump gave them what they wanted so they avoided talking about it. Of course that's true, but it misses the point. In a democracy politicians can't always choose what they want to talk about. At some point a right wing politician will have been taxed about this contradiction by a journalist, or one of their left wing opponents, or perhaps by the leader of a foreign power friendly to the Palestinian cause and hostile to Trump. When that happened, what was the right-wing Israeli politician's response?

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  • I think the big problem with this is the difficulty of proving a negative (as evidenced by the one current answer). I've never heard of any such criticism, but that doesn't mean there wasn't any. Perhaps a better form of the question would be to ask how figures on the right have responded to accusations of Trump's anti-semitism?
    – divibisan
    May 19 at 19:15
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    Changed focus of question to Trump as that's the point. Appreciate that people don't like a politician they support to be associated with Nazis, but if someone is not fully rejected by Trump ('we love you, go home') and calls themself a Nazi, there's not much I can do to make that look better.
    – Ne Mo
    May 19 at 20:27
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    Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
    – CDJB
    May 20 at 21:56
  • I'm not sure this matters. Trump holds no office, so why would another government care what he thinks? Unless he's planning to move there? May 22 at 7:27
  • Did it matter while he was president? Confine your answer to statements then if you like
    – Ne Mo
    May 22 at 9:33
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Why should they respond in any particular way? With little sympathy to either Trump or right-wing Jews, support to Trump from Nazis needs to separated from Trump's own policies, which do generally "check the boxes" from a right wing Jewish viewpoint.

Suppose my government took action on global warming, something I would support. Let's say taking away corporate tax incentives for coal mining. Suppose again that that action was viewed favorably by Stalinist-type Communists (because of corporate disenfranchisement). Does it follow that, because I highly disapprove of Communists (no, that doesn't extend to normal left parties) I should now reverse my approval of my government?

True, if there was widespread approval from the Communist end of things and disapproval from everyone else then I might reexamine my assessment and wonder what was going on. Otherwise, I might just accept it as a coincidence of no great importance. Maybe because I didn't think it important, maybe because I'd rather not think too much about it.

And I would certainly avoid making public pronouncements about it.

This answer is not expressing support for any of the parties involved, be it either Trump or right wing Jewish parties. And certainly not Nazis. Nor is it absolving Trump of worrying behavior from the viewpoint of minorities, including Jewish people.

I just don't happen to see the value of slice and dicing politics in such black and white categories, people are going to act in complex ways, often holding self-contradictory beliefs if you look closely enough. And they are not obligated to shoot themselves in the foot to give you political ammunition.

And, yes, politicians can choose to talk about what they want. Witness for example Trump getting asked anything unpleasant during the debates - time to dodge the question by switching to "the radical left". Would his supporters care? Or in this case, would right wing Jewish people care? Not necessarily, if they thought this line of questioning was more to embarrass Trump than in good faith.

Not only that, but voters can always choose what news they want to listen to and you can bet pro-Trump news outlets get heavily purged of embarrassing news items.

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  • Actually the point is not whether (say) Stalinists say they support a Democratic president, but what the Democratic president says about Stalinists. If there were people at a pro-Democratic coup waving portraits of Stalin and the Democrat refused to condemn them unconditionally, that would be comparable. But the point is there hasn't been a coup attempt to put Dems in power, they don't have supporters waving pictures of Stalin, and if you asked Biden or any other leading Dem they would say 'Stalinism is bad'.
    – Ne Mo
    May 20 at 9:31
  • Overall I think your answer is probably right that they haven't condemned Trump, but I would assume the issue has been raised with them and it would be interesting to know what their defence of their position was. Re 'Response' the initial question was 'have they criticised' and that was rejected as no-one can prove a negative.
    – Ne Mo
    May 20 at 9:33
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    @NeMo: if pushed, the answer would probably be "don't bite the hand that feeds".
    – Fizz
    May 20 at 10:54
  • Taken literally, your answer seems to say that literally no rightwing Israeli heard about this issue, and any rightwing politician who was asked about it just talked about something else. I'm not really convinced that echo chambers are quite so absolute, but if that's what you're saying it would be good to back it up with some information about Israeli media, because this question is about Israeli attitudes, not American.
    – Ne Mo
    May 24 at 14:49
  • And hope I didn't cause offence by editing your answer. Just didn't want you to feel like I'd completely shifted the goalposts on you so made it obvious that I'd changed the question
    – Ne Mo
    May 24 at 14:50

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