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Global affairs analyst Susan Glasser encourages studying Putin's ~17 March 2022 speech in its entirety:

It's really gone in the other direction. Rather than oligarchs having a say over Vladimir Putin, he seems to have put more and more power onto himself personally. (Putin's) speech was absolutely chilling. I would recommend to anyone to listen to a translation of that, it's almost Stalinist in his promise of a new purge inside Russia.

I tried this advice to find a full, unedited version, but...

Search engines make it hard to find

Obvious YouTube searches like this:

putin speech full after:2022-03-16 before:2022-03-18

and google searches such as this:

putin speech full after:2022-03-16 before:2022-03-18

don't provide the full speech. Probably to avoid spreading it.

Western media also avoids spreading it

Western media outlets also don't provide a full version (that I could find) - they're probably also reluctant to spread mis/dis information. This video suggests:

(the) speech was not mentioned in many places, especially in the media in the UK

Question

Although I'm trying to find a particular speech unedited and in full (with English subtitles), this is a good opportunity to learn how to research propaganda more generally. Hence I hope for a general solution (i.e. search tools, methods) that will allow me to find and research other speeches, advertisements, interviews and materials that contain or are considered to be propaganda, misinformation, or disinformation, which might otherwise be hard to find (i.e. through traditional means).

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    @Fizz The speech you link to is from 2 days' later, i.e. it's not the same speech. Putin gave a much more sullen and threatening one 2 days' prior (around 17th March, where he compared those with Western links to flies which should be spat out). Also, I don't speak Russian so would need subtitles (I mention it in the 'Question' section at the bottom, it's a little buried).
    – stevec
    Mar 20, 2022 at 4:41
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    @Fizz please also note this is a good opportunity to learn how to research propaganda more generally for me, 99.9% of the information I need day to day is easy to find via 'traditional' means, so propaganda that I want to research is very much an exception, so this question is much more about how to find dubious content rather than the particular example. a la "teach a man to fish"
    – stevec
    Mar 20, 2022 at 4:52
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    Well, I'm not sure how to answer that other than: "try the original source first". Mar 20, 2022 at 5:00
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    @Fizz although that sounds obvious now you've said it, I hadn't visited the Kremlin website before. I'm sure I'll be on some sort of list now. What surprises me is it's http, not https, which was odd in 2012, let alone 2022.
    – stevec
    Mar 20, 2022 at 5:04
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    @stevec As a part of sanctions, some of the western certificate authorities started revoking Russian certificates, making HTTPS sites inoperable. Current Russian strategy is to push their own governmental CA, but it seems doubtful that western browsers and operating system vendors are going to include it in their trusted lists.
    – AndrejaKo
    Mar 20, 2022 at 16:19

4 Answers 4

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I find Russian propaganda by searching on YouTube for новости (Russian for news). I then sort by time. This gives the most recent Russian news in the original language, Russian. This is how I found "Putin's ~17 March 2022 speech" specifically, as well as all of his speeches from December 2021 until present. Keep in mind that YouTube rather opaque search algorithms may keep only the latest Putin's speeches or other propaganda at the top; older speeches may need other methods to find.

I also search on Google or DuckDuckGo for Russian Channel 1. This gives me the real time broadcast. If this fails, then yandex it.

Both methods utilize a simple fact. Propaganda is never labeled as propaganda. It is always labeled as news.

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    To add some context, several countries (Most notably Mainland China) use the English language word "Propaganda" openly when referring to official state content based on the interpretation of propaganda as meaning "to propagate". The soviet Union also used this term. Mar 20, 2022 at 18:58
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    @AaarghZombies are they using "propaganda" in their English-language communications? If not, they're probably not using the English word but their own. For example, пропаганда is a Russian word.
    – phoog
    Mar 20, 2022 at 19:47
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    The OP is looking for English translations (per explanation in comments) of specific pieces. I'm not sure how searching for "новости" in Russian helps with much of that. I'd agree that much what they pump out on the war is propaganda, but you won't easily find specific pieces like that. You might as well have written: read RT. com, because it's already in English. Mar 20, 2022 at 19:50
  • @phoog 1, As I said, they're using the English language word "Propaganda". In many countries this word simply means "to propagate". It's not seen as implying bias even if the content is bias or comes from a bias source. Mar 20, 2022 at 21:00
  • I've read that YouTube has suspended or blocked some, if not all, state-sponsored Russian channels on YouTube. Can anyone confirm? Mar 20, 2022 at 21:22
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I guess you mean what the Western press called the "traitors" and "scum" speech. That one was apparently on the 16th, not the 17th. Full English transcript published by the Kremlin: http://en.kremlin.ru/events/president/news/67996 It's pretty long, but the Kremlin didn't try to paper over those words... Just the most fiery parts:

We still remember how they supported separatism and terrorism by encouraging terrorists and bandits in the North Caucasus. Just like in the 1990s and the early 2000s, they want to try again to finish us off, to reduce us to nothing by turning us into a weak and dependent country, destroying our territorial integrity and dismembering Russia as they see fit. The failed then and they will fail this time.

Yes, of course, they will back the so-called fifth column, national traitors – those who make money here in our country but live over there, and “live” not in the geographical sense of the word but in their minds, in their servile mentality

I do not in the least condemn those who have villas in Miami or the French Riviera, who cannot make do without foie gras, oysters or gender freedom as they call it. That is not the problem, not at all. The problem, again, is that many of these people are, essentially, over there in their minds and not here with our people and with Russia. In their opinion – in their opinion! – it is a sign of belonging to the superior caste, the superior race. People like this would sell their own mothers just to be allowed to sit on the entry bench of the superior caste. They want to be just like them and imitate them in everything. But they forget or just completely fail to see that even if this so-called superior caste needs them, it needs them as expendable raw material to inflict maximum damage on our people.

The collective West is trying to divide our society using, to its own advantage, combat losses and the socioeconomic consequences of the sanctions, and to provoke civil unrest in Russia and use its fifth column in an attempt to achieve this goal. As I mentioned earlier, their goal is to destroy Russia.

But any nation, and even more so the Russian people, will always be able to distinguish true patriots from scum and traitors and will simply spit them out like an insect in their mouth, spit them onto the pavement. I am convinced that a natural and necessary self-detoxification of society like this would strengthen our country, our solidarity and cohesion and our readiness to respond to any challenge.

As for the title question, I'm not sure how to answer that other than: "try the original source first".

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    This does not answer the question, which is "How can one efficiently find primary sources of propaganda in order to research it?"
    – phoog
    Mar 20, 2022 at 19:42
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    @phoog It does answer it? Searching for Kremlin propaganda, finding it on the Kremlin website.
    – gerrit
    Mar 21, 2022 at 10:15
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    @gerrit then what is the rest of the answer for? Mar 21, 2022 at 14:45
  • @user253751: an example of how to do that, applied to the specific pieced the OP is asking about. I wasn't sure whether to provide a quote, TBH, but there was some ambiguity which speech the OP was asking about, as Putin gave one almost every day. First I thought the OP was asking about his stadium speech on the 18th. Mar 21, 2022 at 22:23
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If you are a journalist or a researcher intended to study propaganda, try to reach some Russian academic institutions with journalism or similar profile. Say you want to do comparative study of American and Russian propaganda, explain the situation and they likely will share some public media, independently from they views. Likely photos make the most room for research: you could work for pinning the exact location by checking the details in the background against the map of the location, for instance.

If you just want to know the truth, I do not really think you can get the real picture by just mixing and "generalizing" the propaganda of the two sides that are at war. You need to work with sources that may still be biased but somewhat less dependent.

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First of all, I think this is a reference to the March 16th speech rather than 17th. Well, at least the earliest tweet that I saw of it was from March 16th. There is no date on the screen, but it shows the starting time as "16:48".

It's 2 minutes an 9 seconds long. I don't know if there is a longer version.

The "self-purging of society," alternatively translated as "self-purification of society," is mentioned at 2:01 in the audio and at 1:98 in the subtitles.

In case you don't speak Russian, "self-purification" is too generous a translation. The original says "самоочишение." It can be translated as "self-purification." However, in a political context it is too reminiscent of the word "чистки," usually translated as "purges," which was used by Stalin's regime as a euphemism for violent repressions.

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    This does not answer the question, which is "How can one efficiently find primary sources of propaganda in order to research it?"
    – phoog
    Mar 20, 2022 at 19:49
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    @phoog nope. but title of the question does not match the actual question asked.
    – wrod
    Mar 20, 2022 at 20:38
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    Nice catch on the date. 16:48 on the 16th in Russia falls on the 17th in my time zone, so all the local news sites would be dated 17th, which I'll know for next time. Also I wonder if google after and before operators run off local or UTC time (and whether they accept hh:mm) - I'm not sure but need to find that out too.
    – stevec
    Mar 20, 2022 at 23:14

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